Does anyone have a loved one using a Kindle or Nook or other electronic reader?

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Hubby has always been a reader. He even used a magnifying glass to keep reading before his cataract surgery. After surger he could read easily again and did so for years. He still reads the newspaper, but doesn't get very far in any of the books he starts. Part of the problem is comprehension and I know the book format won't change that. But I'm wondering if being able to hold the device without losing his place with pages fluttering and being able to control the font size would be enough to let him enjoy books again.

If you have any experience with elderly loved ones who've tried these devices, I'd love to hear about it. Personally, I love books. I want them filling my bookcases and spilling off my night stand. I love holding them and turning pages. I love loaning them and giving them away and trading them in at a used book store. So I'm not too keen on electronic readers for myself, but I'm open to anything that might be pleasant for Hubby.

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We got a Kindle for my husband several years ago and the ability to change font size allowed him to keep reading. He downloaded quite a number of the free classics. Rather than buy another Kindle, I downloaded the Kindle for PC application on my computer (free). Like irhays, both or us are on the same account and can read each others' choices. When he went into a skilled nursing facility, because of the lack of space, there was always danger of the Kindle falling to the floor and breaking, so we downloaded the Kindle for Mac application to his computer, which he has with him. Thus the Kindle itself is tucked away in its carton, but both of us have access to all the books in our Kindle library. No bells and whistles, just good, solid reading.
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I believe there is also an audio option on many of these e-readers. Maybe your husband would rather listen to someone read to him. My brother-in-law loves this option. I have an older Kindle, love it, the best gift I ever received, but I have never tried the audio option.

I tried to get my mom interested in a Kindle but she doesn't have internet and was just hostile to me. She said, "Don't you have to pay for those books?" And I laughed and told her, "gee mom do you steal yours?" And she won't go to the library either. Just stubborn.
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I got my 85 year old mother started on my Kindle Touch and she liked it so much (to my surprise) that we later got her one of her own. The controls are simple enough that after she got used to them (and we only went over a few at a time), she has been pretty independent. All the content comes through Amazon, but they have lots of older ('classics') for free, including several bible translations. Also our putblic library system links to Wilber (which works through Amazon) so we can check out not only 'print' books but mp3 for the Kindle. Her Kindle and mine are on the same account, so the content that we do purchase, we only pay for once. It has allowed her to participate in my reading group, since moving in with me.
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Thank you all for taking the time to share your experiences!
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I have the Kindle Fire which I love. The font is easy to adjust to any size, turn the page by sliding your finger all the way across the screen. Yes you can only get the books, magazines, newspapers from Amazon but can access Amazon from the device. Easy use of email, surfing the web, storing pictures and watching videos. Of course you don't have to get a Kindle with all these options, the basic Kindle is simply an ereader only.
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Definitely an iPad. I love mine. And you can make the print as large as you want for comfortable reading.
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Hi, I am new to this caregiver role. But my father loves books and uses an Ipad for his reading. Together he and I decided it would make it easier for him to read his books and magazines. The Ipad was chosen because he is a major Apple Geek. However it was my Nook Color that helped make the desision to purchase an ereader of some sort. I am so glad we bought him one. The newer eraders that are less expensive then an Ipad and smaller still have lots of good features like font size and page orientation. Also games like suduko which my dad loves to keep him thinking. The touch pads make them easier to navigate also. Which helps with weak or arthritic hands like myself. All are very easy to get set up. And there are cases for any brand ereader that can hold the reader at different angles to make reading the screen easier and more comfortable rather then having to hold the ereader all the time. Hope this helps and Best Wishes
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Jeanne, soooo sorry! It's not your father but your husband! I just attended this morning my 2nd caregiver group therapy. Most of us are taking care of our parents. I'm still thinking of it...Sorry!!!
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Hi Jeanne, I have no experience with elderly reading ebooks. Unfortunately, most of my family are more of video/movies fans than books. Before I ever got my 1st ereader, I saw on the news of one elderly woman who hasn't read a book in Years. When the ereader came out, her family got her one. She enlarged the font so that she can read. She was over 85 years old and was so happy with her ereader. She kept carressing her ereader.

My 2 sisters got me ereaders: a Sony and a Nook Color. I prefer the Sony (older version) because it's smaller and lighter to carry. The only thing is it only had one lighting (no dimming or brightening). It had only 3 fonts - and the largest font is ridiculous to use because the ereader is small in the first place. After a while, you get tired of turning the page. Good with Sony - I can download more books on it because of "epub" format.

The Nook Color is much better. It's bigger, brightness adjustment, font enlargement. To turn the page, you swipe your fingers across the screen. I hate this because the page would halfway turn and then flip back to the page you just read. (Maybe I'm not swiping it right.) The Nook is heavier than the Sony. So, after a while, when I'm lying down or standing in a long line at the post office, my hands get tired of holding it. So, if your dad is planning to read on the table, then this is fine for him. Now if your dad is NOT planning to surf the web, and just use the ereader for reading only, then this is great for him. If he's planning to surf the web, you will need to get the latest version of Nook. Good with Nook- you can download "epub" formats.

My sis having been trying to get me to say which Amazon Kindle I like. I'm resisting since I'm quite happy with the old Sony (size and weight makes sooo big a plus for me.) My oldest sis was given a Kindle Fire. This is bigger than the Nook Color, surf on the web, and I think is lighter than the Nook Color. Unfortunately, with Kindles - you can only download from Amazon...not from any other websites who sells "epubs" format ebooks.

I think if you're going to enlarge the font, then Kindle Fire is best. (or maybe the latest version?) I think the bigger the screen, the less need to keep "turning" the page which can be so irritating and tiring when reading.

Also, you can get the newspaper thru your ereader. I'm more into books so I never checked out the newspaper-capability.

Like you, I find reading Real Books more pleasurable than an ereader. Books are lighter and when you need to backtrack to something you read, it's much easier to find than an ereader. Yes, I use the ebook reader bookmark but ..when you bookmark so many pages, it's so tedious. A real book, you know that you read it on the top left side of the book somewhere 2/5 th of the book.

But, yes, for elderly readers having trouble reading, I definitely recommend an ereader.

FYI, best to concentrate on the Kindle or Nook - you don't need a computer to download the books. You can access Amazon.com or BN.com thru your ereader. Perhaps you can check out their website and read the pros/cons of their latest ereader versions.
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