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My mom is 96 and started to moan after a viral flu like illness last June. It is the one thing that kinda drives me crazy. It is worse sometimes and barely there other times. But it is there pretty much 24/7. When its bad she even moans while eating very loudly. Just was curious if its a "normal" thing.

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Do the changing Seasons make a difference to the moaning as I wonder if sunlight makes a difference?
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my mom has dementia and severe arthritis. Wasn't sure if she is moaning because of the pain but now I think she is just doing it all the time. Sometimes she is singing then continues moaning until she falls asleep. Sleeping is a struggle and now eating is becoming that way. She goes to adult day care and by the time friday comes she is so exhausted hopefully she will catch up on some sleep this weekend its going to be snowing all weekend anyway no where to go.
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bettymaxwell194 your mom sounds just like my mom. Her saying is "there there there" And she moans too through meals. I hate it. Especially when we have company because I warn them about it and they still will stare and I know they are bothered. And I feel for her because as with your mom she doesn't realize she is doing it. Also like you, I really miss the mom I used to have....I sometimes sit and watch her and feel such a ache in my heart for my mom that was my best friend. I miss my talks with her most.
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My mom is 89 and in an assisted living and has moderate dementia that has progressed over the year to making sounds like "ugh" or "ahh" and often saids "oh boy". I have asked her if she is in pain she asks me why I am asking her that and I told her she makes noises like she is in pain and she said " I do"??? Well I don't mean it. She also on occasion recognizes that she made a noise and will say Ugh Ugh and more Ugh!! She was well liked when she first arrived in the assisted living but now others shy away from her and she can't attend a quiet activity its very disturbing. She does it at mealtime too. And in the wating room of the Doctors office. I used to take her out to eat but not anymore for obivious reasons. I know this is a part of the progression of the dementia but it is hard to watch my mom go through this and I miss the mom I used to have..
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it's nice to know that we are not alone in caring for a loved one. thank you
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No, you are not alone!! And I know it's helps to know that.
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Thanks! I am so glad that its "normal". Its just that she usually doesn't even know that she is doing it. Its just so distracting....I just wanted to make sure others were in my boat to. That I wasn't sailing this vessel alone into uncharted waters!
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My mom also has dementia and she moans almost all the time, each time she moves she moans and sometimes it drives me crazy.
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Have you talked to the doctor about the moaning? It could be some form of discomfort or a part of the dementia. I would look into it more. If it's not a physical problem, you can try to get her to hum a tune or talk to distract her. Definitely talk to the doctor for a follow up. Good luck.
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I would have to wonder if there is a possibility of her aspirating? With elderly, it especially seems to come up when they have had something that weakens them or something. It is NOT like a normal choke, it is referred to as a "silent" aspiration, because it does NOT usually result in coughing. They just have mostly liquids, but sometimes other things too, slip into the airway and can result in moaning, clear nasal drainage, throat clearing sometimes.... it will end up turning to pneumonia if it IS the problem and if it goes untreated. Just a suggestion. It is VERY common with the elderly. I saw it all the time when I was a charge nurse in a nursing home... A speech pathologist specializing in Swallow Studies, or Swallow Disorders can diagnose and treat....
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Excellent point, Hadenough. It IS more distressing to the caregivers and to anyone nearby, as I have discovered at the doctors waiting room. In my wildest thoughts I try to imagine what he is thinking, and it helps me to be more accepting. Not easy, but it helps.
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My mom is in the early to mid stages of dementia and yes, she has a couple of choice phrases/humming noises that are repeated constantly, and there is fairly regular moaning as well. Additionally, about 80 percent of what she says is SUNG. She is not and never has been a singer (like most of her offspring, can't really carry a tune in a bucket) and there isn't any real tune, but she sings almost every thought that passes through her mind and every observation she makes. Anyone else enjoying being serenaded that way? ;)
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I believe this is a comforting tool that is used. It is more distressing to the care givers than the person. Some people rock, hum ect. I had to really turn my mind off to all the noises that my Mom makes. At first I thought that I was supposed to "solve" the problem. When I accepted that this was part of the process I was more understanding.
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My husband lost his ability to talk, say words, communicate very early. He started with the noises/moaning.Yes it made me crazy, he would do it in bed before he fell asleep. I asked him once if he even knew he was making those sounds. He looked at me like he didn't know what I was talking about. Sometimes it is one syllable, sometimes as many as 5. Sometimes almost like a little tune, or song. Like one sound, then 3 quick ones. It varies. When a commercial comes on with music or singing in it, his sounds will get a little higher pitched, as if he is humming different notes!! Almost like he is singing with them. I read somewhere that the sound of their own voice could be soothing to an Alzheimer patient, something they still recognized in a world of strange things. It was so hard at night when he first started doing it, was very hard for me to fall asleep. I would ask God to give me strength so I could ignore it. Most times I don't "hear" him anymore.
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It's not uncommon in Alzheimer's, too.
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My Mom, 84, without dementia moans. It drives me crazy too. She says it makes her feel better.
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My mom is in a memory care facility. I have noticed that a lot of the residents who are more advanced in their illness vocalize- moan, holler repeated phrases, etc. Maybe the flu was coincidental timing with an advancement in your mom's illness. It must require a lot of patience on your part.
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