I have Parkinson's disease and would like to know what to look for in the beginning and till I pass on?

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I forget a lot I'll start to put my car keys in other than were they belong,I have memory loss and getting worst. My hand are starting to shake.

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Jagee2603, I too,am sorry to hear that you have to learn to live with this disease. There's a lot of good information here from people who care for spouses and parents with PD. For deeper research on the stages, which will vary with the individual, try the Parkinson's Foundation at Congratulations for reaching out for support. Please continue this. There may be a Parkinson's group in your community, as well.
Take care,
Carol
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Hi Jagee, my Father has Parkinson's. The very 1st thing we noticed, (actually my Sis noticed), was that he seemed to be unconsciously wiggling one foot while at rest, and quite often. About 5 years ago. Sis brought it up to me that it worried her, I'd seen him do it, but I assumed it was just because he was a self employed business man, (a real driven goal oriented person), ha- just assumed he was keyed up and thinking about getting on the road, giving speeches, having his next meeting. You know kinda bored sitting around with his Mother and kids visiting.

The second thing we noticed, (my self, husband, Dad's Mother), was that he started speaking very softly. If there was much background noise at all, like at restaurants and such, it got to be really difficult to hear him. About 4 years ago.

The 3rd thing we noticed, (his wife), was that he got really fatigued with prolonged strenuous physical activity. Like mowing the lawn with a push mower. Sometimes he'd have to lean against a fence or house just out of nowhere, sometimes would decide to go inside and have a break and fall on the way into the house. About 3 years ago.

4th thing we noticed, (all of us), he started to forget the names of long time business associates, favorite towns where he often traveled, family members. Started calling his wife by my Mother's name, they've been divorced for over 30 years. About 2-1/2 years ago.

Then he started to fall often. For no real reason he could think of. The neuro had been thinking it was post polio syndrome, since he did have polio as a child. But when the falls became so frequent they had a harder look and realized it was actually Parkinson's.

For him, it progressed slowly so far. His legs, (especially the right one), have gotten a lot worse over the last 2 years. Seems to mostly be upon standing, it's like it takes a bit of being on his feet a few minutes to get some bearings. Then he does decent after that. He keeps a cane and or walker handy if we go out and it's a longer walk. Stairs are tough for him, slow, but ok if he takes his time, one stair at a time, and uses the hand rail. Decorative rugs are a culprit to think about getting out of main pathways in the house. Physical Therapy in the water especially has done him a lot of good, and he enjoys it. The long term memory is very good other than the names of people and places sometimes. Shorter term things, or new things, seem to be the hardest. Like running a new cell phone, or their new computer. He hates them and has given up, won't use them, he practically lived on them before. Has given up driving most of the time. He has bad and good days, days he doesn't feel steady on the legs he won't drive, afraid his slowed reflexes may cause a delay with the use of brake pedal, and he doesn't want to harm anyone. The medication for Parkinson's did show some fair improvement, but it took, I'm thinking, at least 2 months to start to show a difference, and a slight increase in dosage after that.

The Docs say Parkinson's is rarely fatal, so don't worry about that, OK? :-) Chin up, look into some aquatic PT if you like the water. It really helps!
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My dad has parkinsons. He is at stage four but still doing ok. There are a lot of great articles on here about it. They helped me alot. Search parkinsons. There is a gentlemen that is going through the dementia part and his honest articles help me understand what dad is going through. Good luck, hsng in there. The best thing is to try to keep moving. They have boxing classes for parkinsons to help plus a few more. We are here to try to help! Hugs.
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In addition to responses you receive here, you may want to look into caregivers_corner. It is mainly for caregivers, but I believe PWPs (Persons With Parkinson's) are welcome to join. They are a caring group of people who will give you helpful responses. Many people live a long time with Parkinson's and are able to continue living much of their life as they are used to. This group also offers good information on treatment.
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I have seen my PMP Doc I go to the VA Hospital they are the ones that diagnosed
me i just want some one to tell me the stages i go thre before my time is up.Thank you
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It is different with different people. My father-in-law had it for some years; first sign was the hand tremor, and then loss of balance. He never did have obvious memory problems, and eventually passed with heart failure. On the other hand, my brother's first symptoms were memory issues; he would get lost driving, which was totally unlike him. The physical symptoms came later, and his memory would fade in and out. He could appear totally "with it" for five or 10 minutes, and then be somewhere else. He recognized people, as nearly as we could tell, all the way to the end, even when he was totally bedridden. At one point, I found myself developing a hand tremor and memory issues, and after some research, stopped taking the statin drug I had been on for a year or so after a heart attack, and both the tremor and mental fog were gone in a couple of weeks, never to return.
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I have known and observed a person with parkinson's over a period of years. He is someone who wants to live, and often lives a better life than most of us when he rallies and is feeling good.
The impressive part-he keeps going and going, with a smile.
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Many people with neuro-degenerative diseases benefit from transitioning to a ketogenic diet, which is low carbohydrate (low sugar and starches) and high natural fats. Look up Dr. Peter Attia, who is researching this.
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All I have to offer is not much. My FIL died early at 77 years of age from Parkinsonism.
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Look for ways to keep moving and meds that help. I was just reviewing an article about a technique that clearly improves gait in Parkinsons. Do NOT believe anyone who tells you your life is over and nothing can be done. Get the best medical and rehab care you can...it adds years to life and life to years. Try Googling PM&R and Parkinsons and your state to find places with more than average expertise in this.
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