Is long term care insurance necessary when grandma lives with me? - AgingCare.com

Is long term care insurance necessary when grandma lives with me?

Follow
Share

I know that Grandma had Long Term Care Insurance when she was living in an assisted living facility. The insurance was with what I'll refer to as "Company A." I believe there was a problem with them not covering her at one point because she wasn't getting enough assistance with her daily activities to qualify for their idea of assisted living. Though, she was only there because Grandpa needed to be there. It was never the right place for her as it was like a cross between assisted living and a nursing home.

Here it is a year later and Grandma lives with me. Another family member is POA and they recently mailed me a long term care insurance form to fill out for "Company B". I called and left a message on the POA's voicemail that I couldn't answer some of the health questions because I didn't know what time period it was in reference to. They responded that I just need to answer about the names of Grandma's doctors over the last several years.

I cannot understand why there was a change in the company the insurance is coming from. It sounds like the POA is applying for coverage from another company. I'm also not sure why Grandma would still need to be covered since she lives with me. I have enough experience to care for her should she need something more closer to nursing home level care.

I'm also annoyed that the POA would not answer my question as to what the insurance form was in reference to (changing companies/providers, a health problem I don't know about, etc.). It seems like they should be keeping me filled in as to what's going on.

Am I misunderstanding something? Does any of this seem odd to anyone? I'll try again to talk to the POA, but it'll have to wait until I see them in person.

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
3

Answers

Show:
Some policies will pay a cash benefit regardless of who the care provider is. If this is a policy like that, then why not make a claim and have the insurer pay up what is due to your grandma?
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Unless Mom has been paying for a long term care insurance policy she is unlikely to be approved for one now. If as Pam suggests this is a case of a transfer between two insurers that is a different matter. As long as the premium payments are current I don't think they can drop her. She may not need the insurance now but it would provide for care in a nursing home if that becomes necessary. It is important to never let a policy lapse because the insurers will probably start from zero and that will be impossibly expensive.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Sounds like the plan may have been sold from A to B. Look into that.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Related
Questions