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My husband 63 yo diagnosed almost 2 years ago from agent Orange. Within this time he meds (levadopa) have been increased to 4x a day plus extended at night. The VA has him seeing a speech pathologist due to difficulty in swallowing. He is involved with tai chi self employed a general contractor but his daily activities have declined and will fall asleep thinking he has not slept at all. They now want to test him for sleep apnea. He is a strong will proud minded man and I am concern these qualities might cause denial and business errors. I need to know if his conditions are normal decline or more rapid? Also I need to know If I should start making provisions of finding a means to supporting us. Without him or license our present construction business will no longer be.

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Just want to get the word out, so I can get N in!
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FL you are violating terms & conditions of website as noted before. Reported.
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I knew nothing about PD but on visiting my mother about a year after my father passed (I lived in another city) I noticed her pill rolling ... i.e. rolling nothing in between thumb and a finger as if there was a pill or small stone there. She seemed well enough for 70 though she was a secretive, hermit type and I put it down to a sort of nervous tic due to aging.

She was eventually diagnosed with PD and passed in a care home last year at age 89. She was never shaky, controlled by meds but she'd had numerous strokes over the years, increasing dementia and eventually frequent falls, necessitating residence in a care home for the last three years of her life.

As said above, it seems that progression is different in every case.
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There is so much we have learned about PD yet so much unknown. It's different for every patient, symptoms, effective treatments and therapies. I've read many stories of how people continued to function in their normal lives for several years after diagnosis and then others that experienced sudden onset of debilitating conditions. My uncle continued to work and did not share this knowledge with anyone but his immediate family for 6 years. At that point, his motor skills were becoming obvious and walking became a chore very quickly. He passed within a couple of years afterward. I'm not sure there is an actual answer to your question. To address your concern in regard to your financial security, planning is the best answer. Be diligent in exploring options for assistance as well as decisions about your family business. Timing can be crucial if considerations exist for selling the business, seeking a partner or hiring someone to carry on the practices of the business. Your location and demographics will play a strong role in those decisions and seeking professional advice would be a positive start.
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I know its a very difficult disease. My father passed away 2014 80 yo from lewy body dementia w Parkinson's. Also difficult. Symptoms of my husband are very similar to my father's but my father's symptoms was more years into the disease than my husband. So I was looking for a timeframe
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Different for every patient. Regular follow up visits can chart a course. Much depends on what other conditions the patient has.
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