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He has a physical therapist come to our house and a speech therapist. He walks with her twice a week and some with me at other times. He is back to sleeping a lot though which worries me.
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My husband is 69 and he was diagnosed about a year ago. Both his neurologist and his internist tell us that he could live a normal lifespan and die from something else before Parkinson's would get him. Apparently there can be a fast progressing or slow progressing type. There are many more meds to calm the symptoms than there used to be. My hubby is on the first (and oldest) med...carbo dopa-levodopa and after a year, still at a minimal dosage. We did get him involved in some physical therapy to get him a set of exercises to help him keep muscles built up so that his balance and walking would stable as long as possible. He's a big guy and I am a short lady, retired RN...and I know, that at 70, I have lost enough strength that I would have difficulty if he fell or needed help to stand from sitting or to transfer. ...so I was trying to be pro active. He is faithful in doing them and we also do a lot of walking together. His gait is slower than normal, but he doesn't stumble much and is still pretty much self care. His biggest complaints are the tremors, back and leg pain and dizzy spells at times. I do hope his is very slow progressing because I am already responsible for coordinating all care for my own parents who both have dementia and Alzheimer's . Dad is placed in memory care for 2 yrs now and Mom is home with caregivers....both live 5 hrs away, so I must make lots of trips away from home to keep their care going smoothly. Hard on husband when I have to be gone for 4-5 days at a time, and go a couple times a month, so I feel very 'pulled'. I have decided that hubby comes first, and we're working in our family to perhaps move the parents together to be cared for by one of our daughters, who is also a retired RN. She and hubby and family WANT to take this on and help. I encourage you to think, with doctors, if PT and walking together would be helpful, as it's made a great difference in our home.
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It is good to know that hopefully he will know me always. I am reading more and trying to find out everything I can. The swalling issues are really scary. His meds and the rehab he had are great and his therapists especially his speech therapist are wonderful. They come to our house and his voice is getting louder and his words are coming out better. The physical therapist gets him up moving and the nurse says hes doing good. Im so glad to see the good changes I just hope they last.
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myssi45, this is a small detail, but the kind of dementia associated with PD (if he does develop dementia) is pretty much the same as Lewy Body Dementia, which my husband had. In that form of dementia it is not typical to stop recognizing people. My husband knew me and all of his family right up to the end. He also learned new people (such as nurses, day care people, etc.) though he might not remember their names.

Many types of neurological diseases involve problems swallowing. If that develops down the road, you'll get lots of help in dealing with it. And as each new symptom shows up come back here and discuss it with others who have been through it.

Try to take on day at a time. It is good to be at least vaguely aware of what to expect, but also know that not every patient has every possible symptom and you'll learn to deal with comes up in your life.

This really is a scary new role. You'll do just fine. Relax. Trust yourself.
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Oh his appetite had declined so Boost and V8 fusion, he got some new shoes he likes but well check those Sketchers out too. I'll also research the cannabis. We have one of the best neurologists around here so were comfortable there.
Thank you all fir the prayers, hugs and calming vibes. I need them all and especially some calm.
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Thank you all, he cant go back to work. He had his own business running a garage and he felt it got to dangerous so he retired. He no longer drives either. He has had the symptoms for about 5 or 6 years now but we didn't know what it was. He was just diagnosed and they keep telling me about dementia which is also scary so I just cry a lot when I have a free moment. I am 50 years old and he has taken care of me for 25 of those and now I got to take care of everybody and I'm trying but its scary when I still feel like a kid. Im taking it one day at a time and we are cherishing our time together. I am so afraid that one day I'll wake up and he wont know me. I think right now I'm just afraid of everything. They tell me he might even get to where he can't swallow.
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My mother has had PD for almost 22 years. She is stable for the most part, but cannot walk anymore..that happened after she broke her leg back in 2005. Just like Linda22 said, symptoms are unique to each individual. Mom's main problem is the rigidity, not the tremors, although those do happen and we can manage them with medication and rest. Find a neurologist you feel comfortable with, and also your primary physician. Mom's primary doctor wasn't an expert on PD, but he sure been fantastic with us and her care.

Take care, I will be praying for you and your husband.
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myssi, my husband is 69, was diagnosed with PD two years ago. This initial phase is a painful, difficult to wrap your head around things phase. My cousin sagely told me to take things one HOUR at a time and to simplify our lives as much as possible. Take a breath, then take another one. Read up on PD, but remember it's symptoms are unique to each person.

It can take some time for the neuro to get the medications and levels to what he needs. But you'll get there. My husband lost weight and his appetite declined so we worked on getting solid nutrition into what he did eat, including Boost and V-8 Fusion.

Footwear is important, to help with shuffling and solid footing. My husband currently loves Skechers slip ons - nice fit but easy to get on and off.

Your friends may not quite know what to make of it all - they'll eventually figure it out. And yes, we get sick of hearing about how great Michael J Fox is doing.

My husband has been back at work, adapts and adjusts as needed. We roll with things as they come up.

It's a miserable illness and yes, it really stinks that our guys have it. But you'll figure out how to live with it, and have joy in your lives. It makes us appreciate little things, like breakfast at IHop, or getting together with friends.

Hugs and sending you calming vibes.
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Gosh, my friend that has Parkinsons, has lived many years, with it. I would say that I have known him for 10 years and he is still doing well.

There are some alternative treatments, that are gaining popularity (from what I read.) I am in a legal medical cannabis state. I would encourage him to research it.
I am 61. I can imagine that you are terrified.
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