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I've been helping one of my neighbors for about 5 years years now. But, as time goes by his amount of care has increased. He has offered me a full time live in position. If I were to accept,what would my license requirements be,what should I expect him to provide and how much should I get paid?

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Be sure to have a written caregiving contract, and make sure you like it.....maybe check online for some sample contracts, blend details from others as needed. You must make sure he has liability insurance, and maybe you would want to buy business insurance too--you don't want to be sued for negligence by his family members. . Your contract should be sure include hours of work, time off, exactly what your job duties are and are not and perhaps most important, how the contract is finished. Can you give 2 weeks notice and be done? Or will he expect you to stay for 3 months until you've interviewed, and trained in your replacement? What about continuing to live in his home after he dies, or moves to nursing home, for awhile? There's quite a few details to be covered in your contract, you should probably ask a lawyer. Rate of pay is whatever he wants to pay you that you will accept. Contract should specify yearly cost of living increases too. And he will have to contribute your Social Security, Medicare & federal/state unemployment taxes.
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Right now I have an aide for Mom. I know this woman from working at our local Visiting Nurses. She has worked as an aide for years with no certificate. A few people I know have worked that way. Certification is required to work in facilities but not privately here in NJ. So like suggested check out your licencing board. If u find your state doesn't require certification or licensing, it still would be nice to still take a course to learn how to lift,etc so u don't injure yourself.
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Requirements vary by state. One resource for clarification for you: Area Agency on Aging.
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Here in NJ I don't think CNAs have to be licensed. LPNs and RNs do.
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Depends on what you have to do for him. Licensing requirements vary from state to state, so check with your state health department.
Check your state labor laws for samples of domestic help contracts and requirements.
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In my state you can get a CPA (Certified Nurses Aide) or Homecare Aide. I've been told they are similar but CPAs can work in nursing homes. Both you get a certified after 6 or 8 weeks training. NHs can give the CPA training but may want youto work for them. Call ur local community college or technical schoolto see if they offer classes. It will help you to learn the correct way to do things so u don't hurt yourself.
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