Liability of bills to collection agency; what happens when there literally isn't any money to pay bills? - AgingCare.com

Liability of bills to collection agency; what happens when there literally isn't any money to pay bills?

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My mom was recently hospitalized for the flu. Her insurance denied the claim saying she could have received in-home treatment instead. Her monthly expenses are already exceeding her income. I pay all her bills and without the financial support of my sisters and I, she wouldn’t be making the ends meet now. My sisters and I are tapped out and can’t contribute any additional money to pay the hospital bills. Her income is just over the allowable amount to receive Medicaid so that isn’t an an option. She lives in the least expensive assisted living place we could find. One of my sisters and I are on her checking account. If the bills are turned over to a collection agency, would we be liable for payment? She has no assets-house, car, or any investments that could be sold. What happens in a situation where there literally isn’t any money to pay bills?

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I just double-checked for North Carolina re Medicaid payment for assisted living, This is what I found:

Medicaid Coverage of Assisted Living Services in North Carolina
Assisted living facilities are generally less expensive and less medically intensive than nursing homes, but are not cheap by any means. Most North Carolina residents living in assisted living facilities pay their own costs. Generally speaking, Medicaid does not cover room and board fees in assisted living facilities. However, if you have little income and few assets, you may qualify for a program that helps pay for assisted living facilities.
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Reply to caroli1
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Call the Area Agency on Aging for assistance with this or Medicaid issues.
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Reply to jjariz
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File an appeal on the insurance denial IMMEDIATELY. You have 60 days. File the appeal even if they say that they're working on it so that you don't miss the deadline. And if necessary, file an appeal at the 2nd denial.
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Sorry, one more thing. Even if you have Medicare, you can still get the Medicaid Long Term Care, that's for the services/supplies mentioned above.

Then there is the other part of Long Term Care which is called MMA, Managed Medical Assistance, which covers medical needs, dr. bills, physical therapy when needed, etc.
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Reply to Myownlife
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Sorry, but that is not true. If someone can qualify for Medicaid Long Term Care, they are covered for: 1. Nursing home, if the meet the level of care requirements, 2. Assisted living facility, 3. own home or apt. or mobile home or whatever - they can get personal care and homemaking services, plus incontinence supplies if needed.

Those who say get an elder care attorney are correct. It is not inexpensive to get one, but if one has no, or very little liquid assets, and within the income guidelines, they can get Medicaid Long Term Care. The area agency on aging should help, but if not, see an elder care attorney.
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Reply to Myownlife
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If/when your mother does become eligible for Medicaid, it would be better financially if she qualifies for nursing home/memory care as opposed to assisted living. Medicaid generally covers nursing home/memory care, but not assisted living. Of course, no one wants to be in a nursing home if she/he could manage in AL, and your mom would need to qualify for a nursing home in terms of activities of daily living to get Medicaid once she qualifies financially.
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Reply to caroli1
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If/when your mother does become eligible for Medicaid, it would be better financially if she qualifies for nursing home/memory care as opposed to assisted living. Medicaid generally covers nursing home/memory care, but not assisted living. Of course, no one wants to be in a nursing home if she/he could manage in AL, and your mom would need to qualify for a nursing home in terms of activities of daily living to get Medicaid once she qualifies financially.
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Reply to caroli1
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BarbBrooklyn: OP states "her income is just over the allowable amount to receive Medicaid." That's puzzling and yes, I saw your other post about the Miller Trust.
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Reply to Llamalover47
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Creditors will come knocking. But it's still not your responsibility. They cannot force you. I read that if you pay even once, then you will be obligated. So do not pay.
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Reply to RayLinStephens
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Why is your mom not eligible for Medicaid?
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Reply to BarbBrooklyn
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