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I am sorry. I didn't see that he had seizures when I responded. three words: sleep apnea test. If he has never had a sleep study and is able enough, and the doctor agrees to refer him to a sleep medicine specialist, then they can test his sleep, with video and monitoring overnight during the test. But it just depends if the doctor thinks it is worth doing or not, for a lot reasons.

Typically it takes two sleep studies to determine if more treatment is required. Patients that never have sleep studies due to other health reasons are prescribed sleep medications sometimes. Age and medical issues are factored into the referral.

Patients that have severe sleep apnea typically are recommended to be on a cpap machine type recommended by the sleep medicine specialist, first. It can be lifestyle-changing for many. If they determine that is not working either, they may prescribe the sleep medications instead anyway. Hard to tell.

But one practical note is: sleep studies and the equipment and replacement costs, as I have heard, are a lot cheaper than an assisted living or nursing care facility on an annual basis. Of course, there is some extra management for a home caregiver, that is family, ordering supplies, cleaning, etc on annual basis, and some people do not adjust to the nightly cpap machine, I.e. that are even just diagnosed with moderate sleep apnea all that well. Another factor that a doctor will determine whether it would be financially and health-viable to your parent. Good question to ask.

Research indicates that resolving sleep apnea diagnosis issues lowers risk of seizures and stroke, which are life-threatening, and both require medications anyway for that, etc. Just feedback to think about during his next primary doctor visit. Good job. You took care of him.
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Thanks to all of you, I just forced him awake, made him drink protein smoothie and sit-up for 20 minutes. He didn't like it but
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My husband had "excessive daytime sleepiness" which was part of his dementia. He took a medication for the sleepiness and that worked well.

The first time I had "excessive daytime sleepiness" and total disinterest in eating it turned out to be diabetes. Years later the sleepiness was caused by sleep apnea. Both conditions were treatable once diagnosed.

BTW, my diabetes went undiagnosed for months, even though I was seeing a doctor for my symptoms about every 2 weeks. She was so sure I had "anxiety" that she didn't bother to test for anything else. I was finally diagnosed in an ER. I guess running lots of tests isn't always the same as running the right tests.

I am so sorry you are dealing with this. I wish the best for your dad.
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I also ask him if he is feeling bad he says no or yes my stomach ask again it's something else.
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I am not trying to be difficult but they ran all these tests and they did a x-ray and echocardiogram came back negative. I do intend to call his doctor but found this group thought I would ask you all.
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He sleeps way more than 7 hours, he will not get out of bed without force. Some of the meds do make him drowsy but he has no desire to wake up or get up. He won't eat I have forced him to drink ensure and trying to now get him to drink a protein shake, unless I stand there and force he won't drink it. No recent traumas beside the hospital stay.
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I agree with Jeanne on this - have his doc check his heart and pulmonary function - heart problems often result in extreme fatigue, which in turn, results in excessive sleepiness and the need to rest. The seizures are concerning as well, and it may be worth looking into whether damage has been done to his brain that is affecting his ability to stay awake.
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BelAsh, while it may be normal for elders to sleep more, that usually means an afternoon nap and going to bed earlier. Sleeping all day and night is not normal aging.

Having seizures is also not normal aging. Your father has something else going on besides old age. Without knowing what that is, it is difficult to decide how to treat the excessive sleeping.
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The answer lies in several topics. Does he sleep more than 7 hours. The minimum for an elderly person should be at least 7 hours. Does he go to bed too late because of anxiety that he may not be able to sleep? no TV after 8pm is a good start, once in bed, he needs 1 or more hours to wind down so he can sleep, hopefully. Is he taking sleeping medications or anxiety medications at the right dosage? Is he waking up in the middle of the night and needing to go to the bathroom often? A primary doctor can lower the dosage of those medications, to decrease fall risk, a major issue when you get old. Not sleeping, being a fall risk, etc can be handled by primary and if he is urinating often in middle of night, the primary can refer him to a urologist to possibly help with that issue. An assisted living facility will require him to be on a schedule for being awakened to eat, because not eating, not sleeping, being a fall risk due to these issues can cause more issues than he already has. How much is he eating? breakfast, lunch and dinner in smaller portions of foods or drinks he will eat. If he eats a sugary snack 1 hour before bed, i.e. 400 calories, ice cream, ensure, even fruit. Get him on a schedule. It is very hard for family members to change this schedule for their parent, so an outside influence may be required, that handle the agenda you want to achieve.
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Yes I have discussed w his doctor. She says it's normal for elderly to sleep more. He only wakes sometimes to use bathroom, he will sleep all day has gotten progressively worse over last month. He has had two hospital stays over the last three weeks for seizures but the sleeping was getting worse before the seizures
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Have you discussed his sleeping habits with his doctor? I think the answer depends somewhat on the cause.

How many hours a day does your father sleep? How long has this been going on? Is he losing weight? Does he have any impairments -- poor vision, poor hearing, mobility issues, loss of memory, coughing, etc?

Has he lost someone close to him recently?
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