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I live in NJ and own a condo in a 55+ community with my Grandma as her caregiver. The board and association obviously knew our situation. Unfortunately, my Grandma recently passed away, now my worry is...can I still live here? I am in my late 40s, quiet, in good standings, and get along with my neighbors. I don't really want to go to the board to ask them any questions cuz I would rather bring undo attention to myself. I'm on the deed and co owner since we bought the condo maybe 10 years ago or so. I have no place else to go nor would I want to. Can I legally be kicked out of my home that I own? Thank you for any information you can provide. I really appreciate it.

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I believe that the FHA has an exclusion for age. I looked at it a little further today. However, all it may come down to for you is that your name was already on the deed. Idk (I don't know).
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You really also need to look into the FHA (Fair Housing Act) to see if it has any insight into your unique situation. Since you were already on the deed, idk how they can ask you to leave though I could be wrong. (insert lawyer)
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I was in the same situation as you. Ours is a coop, 55+ with the other person living in the home can be 50 and up, HOA. I was living here in my 40s under reasonable accommodation for my mother, I was on the deed since the 1990s. What I did is along the way, since we own shares of our land is I was added as a shareholder, I did this all in preparation for an easy transition in case my mother died..they okay’d the shareholder...as soon as I became 50 I went and had myself added, with the board approval and a background check, as a resident, because now I was of the age requirement and not just a “living accommodation” anymore. I was approved of that. It is done. If my mother dies, I am an approved resident, even though I might not be over 55 yet..it’s all in the rules, and I followed the rules..
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I suggest you direct this question to an attorney.
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In my mother's 55+ community, there are quite a number of adult children under 55 living with elderly parents. I believe they all were allowed in as caregivers, whether that's actually the case or not. There is one instance of a resident in her 40s who lives alone in the home since her mother has transferred to a nursing home. The community sort of looks away in that case, but that may be different because there's always the chance that someone in a nursing home could come back to the home. I think it depends very much on the particular board you're dealing with.
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PoeticJustice32, if the 55+ community allows renters who are over 55, you might be able to rent out the condo for a few years. If there is no mortgage on the condo, then you can use the rent money to find a nice rental for yourself until you are old enough to move back in.

You would need to check with the Board to see if you could rent, as there might be a percentage limit of units that can be rented by investor owners, and that quota may be already filled, hopefully not.
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I have sat on the board of governors for 3 condo associations. All 3 required the primary owner to be 55+.

A caregiver can be any age...the association cannot deny a live-in caregiver except for criminal behavior.

No association I have ever dealt with willl allow a resident below the age of 55, owner or not.
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I was the office mgr for a 55+ mobile home community. It was the federal government that set the standards for occupancy. The community must maintain 80% of over 55. The other 20% can be any age.
If you follow the rules, don't cause problems, pay on time, and are courteous, they will want you to stay. You will have lots of years before you become one of those who need to go to a home but won't so the rest of the community has to step in and take care of you (this actually happens).
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You can also request a variance from the BOD if your bylaws are that strict. I would hope your neighbors would not have any problems granting the variance (it requires votes from a majority of the unit owners). Also, your association documents should be on file and online from the clerk of courts as these are legal documents.
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Yes. I checked all this out years ago and they have the right to request you leave if you don't meet the age requirements.

However, ask - you won't know for sure until and unless you ask the board of directors, or whatever it would be called.
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Grandma lived in a 55+ condo facility. They were pretty lax about the exact age of the owner--but they DID NOT allow children under 16. Period. Read your bylaws and in the meantime, don't go looking for trouble.

Your condo association is made up of other condo owners, right? This should work in your favor.

Good Luck!
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I agree with all of the above. You need to find out what the bylaws say. Some communities do allow a percentage of people under the state age to live there, but others do not, or require a require a specific exemption such as for a nurse or caregiver to the older person living in the home.
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Check the by-laws.
In most cases yes you can be asked to leave.
Once the person you were living with is no longer living there then you have to leave. Does not matter if you are 8, 18 or 48. You could probably find someone over 55 to move in with you and that would satisfy the board. Unless the requirement is the person "owning" the property has to be 55 or older.
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As a board member of a 55 plus community you need to request your bylaws from the association manager or president. In my community the age restriction is not as strict as a neighboring community. In the other community, when an owner passed, the community would not allow the son to stay while he was the executor of the will. By the way a comunity death is usually well known.
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I doubt they will throw you out. Most age restricted communities allow for a certain percentage of owners to be under the age requirement. (As long as there aren't any school age children in the dwelling) Check the HOA by-laws. You should have a copy and it should specify the rules.
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