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I'm a new caregiver on a private assignment. The "lead" caregiver has purchased cameras to install in our client's home. The client has mild dementia and I think the idea of cameras are completely unnecessary and a violation of her privacy. The daughter is also against the cameras, but feels "shut out" by the lead caregiver and feels she has no say. I told the daughter she needs to have a sit down with the caregiver and express her and her mother's concerns, but she says the caregiver brushes her off. Yes, I'm wondering what I've gotten myself into. I always try to be respectful of my clients and their family and obey the laws regarding the rights of my clients so I'm having a hard time with this situation. Also, the church is somehow involved in all of this. It all seems very unsavory to me. Who can I talk to or am I blowing things out of shape?

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Church and lead caregiver are in church of the money? I smell an APS case for financial abuse of a vulnerable adult.
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Really hoping same lead caregiver is not in charge of Mom's money.
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Thank you all for your responses. It sounds to me as though the cameras are for the lead caregivers benefit as she has told me this will allow her to monitor the goings on in the home when she is not here. Hmmmm....that's not right. She hired a professional (me) to keep an eye on the client and her home so why the need for cameras. I am here 5 days a week and trust me -those cameras will never be used for my benefit. After sleeping on this last night I have come to the conclusion (because my gut knows the right thing to do) that I must contact the proper sources so that this woman and her family do not continue to find themselves prey to those around them. And yes, the church & lead caregiver are somewhat in charge of her money --something that I have only learned in the last few days. I don't like the thought of this at all! Also, I do pay Social Security & Medicare taxes and continue to work for an agency. Thanks again for the wonderful responses!
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i agree with BarbBrooklyn, I would call APS with my concerns. If they are doing nothing wrong then they won't mind a bit.
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AliBoBali -thank you for your response. I happen to know (or thought I did) this lead caregiver well as we previously worked together thru my agency before she decided to leave the agency & work private assignments. I honestly don't believe this client requires monitoring as she is not in any way your typical fall risk as her balance is just as good as mine at the time. The other caregiver has expressed an interest in keeping an eye on things when she is not here --which is when I am here 4 days a week. I understand cameras for safety reasons -such as baby monitors, but these are more sophisticated, internet wired, custom ordered cameras. Totally unnecessary and over the top. There are very few people coming and going from the home -visitors from the church 1x weekly during the first 3 weeks of my stay here. That's it....There is no reason for anyone to have camera level suspicion of any activity going on as the client leads a very quiet life. Reads the newspaper, mail, watches tv programs and has a nap during the day. Yes, the daughter seems apprehensive of the caregiver & I see signs that the other caregiver might only be in this for $$$ & control. Many of those details I have left out to protect the privacy of this client. I have placed a phone call to a Social Worker friend, but she is out of the office until Monday. Thank you again for your reply.
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Someone can NOT come into MY home and install a camera without my consent.
If the homeowner or the daughter do not agree to this then it can not / should not be done.

Now I agree that a security camera is a good idea. But it has to be my idea. And I have to be the one to have it installed.

There is no way I would want any caregiver, or anyone else for that matter, to have access to view what is going on in my home.

If this is a caregiver from an agency I would have the caregiver replaced, she or he sounds like they are getting a little to "comfy" and boundaries are being overstepped. If this is a privately hired caregiver it may be time to look for another "lead" caregiver.

And by the way there is no way I would allow the type of monitoring that you describe in my house. A baby monitor is one thing but to have the type of system that you describe so the caregiver can view what is going on at any time from anyplace is excessive.
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The OP wrote " And yes, the church & lead caregiver are somewhat in charge of her money --something that I have only learned in the last few days."

Perhaps the church and "lead caregiver" have POA? Guardianship?

I can't imagine how a caregiver can "brush off" concerns about installing a camera in the client's house. There is something fishy afoot, I fear.
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Uhhh
Who hired you? If the client has dementia then I hope the daughter has POA but you might not be privy to this information

By private caregiver am I assuming correctly that they are not withholding taxes from your pay? Is so, you're doing yourself a disservice -you will need social security benefits some day and what if you were hurt in the line of duty ? Workers comp insurance exists for a reason

If this is the case, whether a church is involved or not it doesn't sound like the right position especially in relatively good economic times
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Whoa! Talk about overstepping boundaries!

I wonder, legally, who owns the content. The homeowner, i would think.

I would be extremely suspicious of the motives of this "lead caregiver". Where did the daughter find Her? I wonder if a background check has been done.
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My problem is that it seems to be the caregiver and the church who are installing cameras in someone else's private residence. Checking up on where the checkbook is kept, is my first thought.
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