Is it legal in the state of Missouri to have a camera in my Mom's apartment to monitor a health aide's behavior?

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My mother is 88 years old and lives in an independent senior living apartment. She goes down three times a day to the dining room 3 times a day and aides come in 4 times a day to assist her with medicine, oxygen, personal care, etc. Mom has slight dementia and is returning to her apartment after being in rehab for 1 /2 months after a hospital stay. We believe one of the aides has lied about what my mom has done and said. Their stories have not matched and she has been leading us to believe my mom's memory was really bad. My mother has insisted she knows what is going on and is not lying. There was an incident with the aide that could have severely affected my mother's health. We have installed a camera that shows us what is happening in mom's apartment. We can watch and hear, but not record. What we have seen shows that my mother is correct and what she is telling us is really happening. My mother does not know about the camera. Is this legal in the state of Missouri? That is my question.

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Since it is confirmed that the cams are ok to use in MO, I have a thought. You may not want to disclose you are using a cam. You may want to use one in the future and if they know about it it won't be useful anymore. On the otherhand, if you do have to eventually let them know about the cam, it might be a deterrant to those giving bad care if they allow you to keep it there.
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"Nanny cams" are totally legal in MO. In this case it's not the nanny but the caregiver.
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I live in MO and yes, it is legal to use a camera to monitor a caregiver. There are states that prohibit the use of recording speech from a caregiver but MO isn't one of them.
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It's not worth diddly if you cannot record. The judge will not listen to your "hearsay". Take it up with the aides' supervisor, tell them you have seen it, but if they demand evidence of wrongdoing, you have NONE unless you record. " I saw it happen" will give them a pretty good idea they are being watched. In public places such as shops, streets, and government buildings, video surveillance is widespread and completely legal. On the other hand, in locations where an individual has a reasonable expectation of privacy, has not consented to recording, and is in a state of partial or full nudity, video surveillance is considered to be an invasion of privacy and punishable as a Class A misdemeanor. So if MOM doesn't know you are watching, you are invading her privacy.
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