is it legal for assisted living facility to leave main doors unlocked and unattended at night?

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I live in NY State and the memory care unit where my mom is has its main doors locked at all time. I use a pass code to get into the building. And there is a big sign on the door when you leave, that tells visitors not to let anyone out with them unless they have the code.
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I agree with cwillie, residential buildings are secured, why not Assisted Living.

Where my Dad lived, it was Assisted Living where the exterior doors were locked, only those with a code could come in and out. The Memory Care was on a separate floor where there was extra security such as the elevator would not work unless someone had the code. Those on other floors had access to the elevator so they could socialize any time of day.

It all depends on State Laws as to what is required of Assisted Living, and those that had Memory Care.
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Almost all modern apartment buildings have secured entrances and I think it is odd that an AL does not. Is this a new problem that needs to be fixed, and if not, why would you move into such a building?
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The residents in AL are free to come and go; it's those that are in MC who are locked in for their safety.
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It's legal, but they may be on the hook if a resident who shouldn't leave, leaves and something bad happens to them.
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Not sure about legality, but I share your concern. Those that I'm familiar with in our area are locked early in the evening, but have a keypad, and residents have the code. Oh, and the locks don't lock people in; they lock people out.
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My concern is that some stranger might just walk in one night and harm someone.
Many patients do not lock their apartment door at night because they cannot remember
how or just forget to do it since they have dementia.
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Why not? Residents are not prisoners. What is your concern?
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