Is it legal or ethical for a nurse practitioner to accept gifts from patients that are dying and/or who have passed away? - AgingCare.com

Is it legal or ethical for a nurse practitioner to accept gifts from patients that are dying and/or who have passed away?

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Gifts such as homes, vehicles or money.

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Homes, vehicles or money? No, not so much.
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Riley, I agree, if the patient was incompetent, the patient may think the caregiver is her "daughter" or "grand-daughter" thus would give jewelry to the wrong person.

Then the caregiver should consult the family and ask what to do.
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I just replied above "Riley 2166" - I meant to say if the patient was INCOMPETENT, then there will be a major problem and I'd say no.
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I think it entirely depends on the circumstances and the types of gifts involved. If the gift is something simple, like costume jewelry, or a painting, something of not a high value, I think it would be a nice gesture. But I would have the family give the caretaker something in writing that the gift was being given out of gratitude and love and the family has no objection. In other cases, it is much more difficult. For example, if the caretaker is very kind and loving, and the family is not that way. The patient should have the right to gift if it is wished but with some common sense. If it includes large sums of money or property, a professional should be called in to prepare whatever legal paperwork, i.e. a will, is needed. If the patient is competent, well, then you have a major problem and I'd probably say no to the gifts.
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No. NO AND NO!
A box of chocolates maybe to be shared by all who participated in her care.
OTHERWISE NO NO NO
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Working in Elder Care (and no, I was not a nurse) my clienst would frequently want to "gift" me something. Usually some ancient lotion that had turned skunky or some such thing. Since it was not a hospital setting, rather, this woman's home, I would dutifully trot out to the daughter and ask her what she thought. Inevitably she'd look at the item and say "Oh. Mother wanted to clean closets today. That's fine." Money tips at Christmas came from the family's oldest son and were obviously "cut" from the checkbook he used for mom's care. I questioned the ethics of it once and he said "We'd pay you 100xs what you make to keep mom happy as you do."
Still, this was ONE situation and I was more a member of the family than professional caregiver. It really didn't happen again with any other clients.
As far as a hospital setting? I routinely took cookies in to the transplant "wing" of the hospital where hubby spent so much time. Not one person said anything other than "Can I get that recipe?"
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See also Hilaire Belloc's Cautionary Tale about John Vavassour de Quentin-Jones. Would you "accept" Miss Charming?!
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That's an interesting comparison you make, Castle. But it does touch on a hot topic in business at the moment, where there has recently been a whole palaver about the grey area between incentives and relationship building merging into bribery and corruption. So practices that used to be not just common but de rigeuer, like hospitality and gifts, are increasingly being banned by compliance departments precisely because of the difficulty of proving that they are not part of a general culture of backscratching, sweeteners and all the other euphemisms for "crooked as heck!" I read yesterday that Lloyd's of London, the insurance marketplace, has forbidden its direct employees to consume any alcohol at all during the working week, and it's not because they're afraid somebody might misplace a decimal point after too good a lunch - it's about no more friendly deals over a pint of bitter or a bottle of claret at Balls Brothers wine bar.

Getting back to our planet (!) - professionals in all walks of life are held to a higher ethical standard when they occupy a position of trust, and that's the problem here. When a caregiver has been part of the family, perhaps for years, and the client's will, drawn up by his attorney, includes "to Mary, in grateful recognition of her exemplary care and compassion, I leave etc." nobody is going to have a problem. But when an elderly lady with dementia presses a valuable item of jewellery on you, how are you going to be sure she meant you yourself to have it and that she wasn't under the impression that you were her granddaughter? Especially, how are you going to prove that if somebody challenges you? Hence the regulatory authorities tend to apply Occam's Razor - the simplest solution being the best - and say no gifts, no tips, no incentives. Then there can be no doubt.
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Exactly freqflyer. I think it is not only OK, but ethical. What on earth is ethics, other than an attempt to bring respect, exchanges within a possible range as related to time and attention given - I think the conversation tends to end with the broader discussions of nursing - where the bulk of activity is for shorter time periods and interchangeable people, as if calm, encouragement, humor, meaning, reliability and support, did not also improve healing.

Many times men are accustomed to giving tips and rewards, where women will look around at others and ask others first, "is this OK?" - where men are more accustomed to working in a broader work world where exchange of physical services are routine, and where proportional rewards are valued.
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My Dad asked me before his finals days to please remember his two caregivers who had been with him for over a year..... as the caregivers were outstanding, patient, and always brought a smile to Dad's face every day... plus they would bring in balloons and small gifts for my Dad for his birthday, Christmas and for any holidays.   Christmas 2015 I gave them both, plus other semi-regulars, Target gift cards but first I checked with their Agency, it was ok.

Thus, after Probate is finished, I will forward checks to these two wonderful Caregivers.   Since my Dad is no longer their client, I feel it is ok to do this.
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