I keep lashing out at my husband, who is a kind and sweet man even during his dementia, when he keeps asking the same questions?

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Hubby is a sweet and gentle soul. And, as we all know, repeats questions almost with the same breath over and over again. I've been using your suggestions of "using the same answer words", "keep it simple", "remember it's the disease", "change the subject" (which sometimes doesn't work by the way). But, sometimes I am at the short end of MY stick. This has happened twice to me now in the last month as far as my lashing out in frustration and anger. He doesn't deserve it. He's done nothing wrong. Do I walk out of the room telling him I need some time to think? Like in AlAnon? Or any other suggestions?

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Thank you GardenArtist. Creative thinking, indeed. And spur of the moment answers. Such wonderful challenges. And my responses here in this post are of kindness.
I get him to read out loud to me. Seems to keep him occupied while I'm working on the computer since we're in the same room. I just keep "umhumming" and "is that so" every so often. Works
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Cheyenne, if he enjoys reading, you might try switching the repetitive conversations to what he's reading. If he understands the material well enough, ask him to tell you about the new ship. Ask about everything - propulsion, weapons systems, mission, etc.

If he was in the Navy, segue into conversations about boot camp, deployment, missions, etc.

Military guys love to talk about their live in the service.

A really challenging method though would switch your frustration from creative thinking. How can you answer the same question differently each time? That would show real creativity on your part and hopefully would be inspirational rather than frustrating.
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Singingway, my Hubby would think I'm the one with dementia if I did any of those things. The caregiver and I also played music. We played some of his old records. Sound wasn't good enough. But, he's been reading about Military ships especially the new one to be launched.
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Other ideas: Go tactile. Hold him. Hand him some play-dough, silly putty or therapy putty. Hand him a popsicle. Or a soft fuzzy or furry item -- a toy, or a live dog. Play happy music. I had a pile of party blowers (the kind that unroll, but NOT the kind that squeak) which helps exercise the lungs as well as diverts that talking energy.
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Singingway, you say can no longer take care of US, or comfort US.
Yes, how true you are. He and I are a blended family. I'd bounce off my problems to him; and he'd give thoughts. Now ----- well, not very much any more because he doesn't remember families too much any more. And your right, sometimes, he can't figure out how to even put on a shirt. Hugs to you.
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Sometimes I would plug my MP3 player into large visible headphones. Whether I had the player actually ON or not -- I would smile and nod at any interruption, then dance a little and turn away and keep washing dishes. It was a big signpost saying..."I can't hear you" which gave me a needed respite.
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When I think of the times my exasperation came out - it was because underneath was GRIEF. We are living with a person we have known as smart, and capable. And holding that image superimposed over the current reality of their confused mind repeating questions, or their inability to figure out how to put on a shirt, is grief, and profound loss -- we feel sadness for ourselves, as that person can no longer take care of US, or comfort US. And often, there IS no-one else to do that. We've lost the part of our best friend that could relate to us in an equal give-and-take, and now it seems, only part of them is left. The part that needs our care, effort and time. For me, just knowing that what I felt was grief, helped a bit.
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Loving someone and sometimes getting annoyed with their behavior isn't mutually exclusive. God knows I'd be divorced by now if it were! Personally, I think it's completely "normal" ( not a big fan of "normal" classifications ) to occasionally snap at someone you live with. The key is to not do it too often, apologize when you do, reassure the person that you love them and finally - not beat yourself up too much when it happens. We are human and we make mistakes. The best we can do is to learn from them and work to do better.
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Yes We are very familiar with repetive questions, but I never let it bother me though as I know it's not my Mother's fault it's the dam Alzheimer's. When I'm preparing dinner Mother will ask me numerous times WHAT ARE WE HAVING FOR DINNER TODAY JOHN ? and each time I will answer like as if I had not been asked before. Why make My darling Mother feel bad or embarris Her, no never. We as Caregivers love those Who We care, and We must show it.
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Cheyenne, I know how it is. My mother really wore me down when she would repeat herself over and over and I didn't live with her. I don't have any answers for you. Just know that others understand you and your situation.
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