I take care of a lady (98) that's not on Hospice but is suddenly unable to remember or know where she is. Any advice?

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If she is healthy can she criteria for hospice care is needed.

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It is quite possible that she's had a stroke, & no matter how mild, it may be affecting her memory. The notations written about hospice might also be helpful. She needs a medical evaluation both for the stroke and also assessment for the hospice care. In the meantime, circulatory issues causing poor blood supply to her brain can cause these lapses in orientation. Gently present to her where she is, but do not argue or scold or correct her.
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Get medical attention NOW. Hope it is not too late to make a difference. I am utterly failing to see why anyone would think "hospice" first instead of emergent medical care, and would love to hear and understand what made that come to mind for you first. Just being 98 does not mean you can't or shouldn't be helped with some acute medical problems.
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Especially since she's 98,, I would take her to her doctor like NOW!
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Are u a hired caregiver? If so, you need to make whoever is in charge of her aware of the change now. As said, it could be a UTI or a stroke. For both, she will need hospitalization immediately.
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Suddenly? She could have had a stroke. She needs to be seen by a doctor. Hopefully you can get her to one asap.
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As jeannegibbs said, a sudden change in cognition level is a matter for concern. This needs a medical eval ASAP!
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Lisabetty, My partner near the end, thought we were in the RV. He thought we had better move the RV as people would start to get upset because we are where we are for too long. He was check for an infection. The onset of confusion began about a week before he passed. I had to go out an buy mouse traps as he told me he saw a mouse run across the floor. There is no telling what they will see or do when they are dying.

I found it very difficult to get across to my Partner that he had a cathater. He tried to get out of bed. We could not figure how he did it one night. Over the rails?? No, he scooted down the bed and went out the bottom of the bed. Of course he collapsed and I had to call medics to help me put him back in bed. He wanted to use the bathroom. There are all sorts of things that come up. being unaware of where he was, seemed the worst.
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"A Common Sense Guide to Alzheimer's Care Kisses for Elizabeth is written for both family and professional caregivers of people with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. It is a practical resource for anyone experiencing difficulty with significant behavioral issues but is also helpful to caregivers who simply want to provide the best possible care. The author has developed 15 common sense guidelines which address a wide variety of concerns by helping caregivers to solve problems or even prevent them.

The guidelines also address negative behaviors such as wandering, combativeness, paranoia and sundowning. The book explains what dementia is, how it affects people who suffer from it and why these behaviors occur. Stephanie D Zeman MSN RN has included over 40 true heartwarming stories about her patients with dementia and ways in which the guidelines were applied to help resolve their problems and enhance the individuals quality of life


Since one of the best ways to learn is by example, Stephanie D Zeman MSN RN has included over 40 true heartwarming stories about her patients with dementia and ways in which the guidelines were applied to help resolve their problems and enhance the individuals quality of life."

----- You really need to know correct dementia diagnosisAlzheimer's disease and dementia, there is a distinct difference, other dementias: Vascular dementia, Parkinson'sdisease, dementia with Lewy Bodies and Frontotemporaldementia. Some causes of dementia aretreatable and evenreversible. source: Mayo Clinictinyurl/qdgj9g Carers need to know correct diagnosis.

By far, the most serious danger posed in the earlier stages of the Alzheimer's disease is when the individual may decide they want to go for a walk, go searching for "home," or maybe just walk outside to get the paper. In a restaurant they may go to a rest-room. When they turn around, the place they expect to see is gone and they find themselves standing helplessly confused what they see is totally unfamiliar to them.

It is IMHO the host accompanying the person should understand the individual has Alzheimer's Disease, be aware of the danger, and treat the person with patience.
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If this confusion came on suddenly I suggest having her checked for a UTI. That infection can really give the elderly very strange cognitive symptoms.

As to whether she might be eligible for hospice care, in general that level of care is for persons who have terminal conditions that are in their final stages. Depending on what is behind her sudden lack of orientation as to where she is, at her age it might be worth having a discussion with a local hospice organization, just to get their take on how you will know when she is ready.

Does she have relatives to help her make decisions?
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