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She has POA His medication says don't take with alcohol yet she offers him it. He also will ask for booze.
We live in Montana.

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I seriously doubt that she can be held liable. The POA is there for her to act in his stead if he can't perform certain tasks but he has choices, too. She's not forcing him to drink. Is she enabling him? Yes. However, this is their lifestyle.

If they both drink to excess they may benefit from treatment for alcoholism, although with dementia, the husband may not have the memory or desire to make it work.

You could check with Montana's Attorney General's office but otherwise my personal opinion is that this lifestyle is their choice unhealthy as it is.
Carol
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Perhaps you can make in your notes to your agency what you have observed, and they can contact the doctor in charge. Drinking alcohol with medication is dangerous, but with people who drink alcohol that habit is very hard to stop, and you have to allow them to do what they want to do. It is not a perfect world, but your job is to assist them, not judge them.
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Being POA and giving her husband alcohol have nothing to do with eachother. POA doesn't carry that kind of power. It's not an abuse of POA to make her husband a cocktail.
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She could be liable if something happens to cause harm, etc. The alcohol could make him unsteady and cause a fall or effect his behavior. Do they have any relatives? Do you were for an agency? If you are concerned is there someone you can pass the information along to? You might feel better . Also, suggest that the drinks be diluted with spritzer or lots of ice.
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If there's a drug/alcohol interaction, she could be considered responsible, but that's a different level than liability. I don't know whether criminal charges would be brought, or if APS would be brought in if the husband suffered a severe reaction and ended up in the hospital. That is a possibility.

However, these people are apparently going to drink even when it's not healthy. So perhaps the best you can do are (1) counsel them on the drug/alcohol interactions, and (2) document, document and document in your files and make your supervisors aware of the situation.

If you do see evidence of drug/alcohol interactions, raise that issue as well with your supervisors and they can decide whether or not to intervene and contact APS.

(I'm assuming you're working through an agency in a caregiving capacity?)
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Liability implies legal liability, and for that, you have to have grounds. If he were declared incapacitated and she forced him to drink, that would be one thing, but for now, he has the right to make his own decisions, as inadvisable as they may be. Legality and morality are two different things.
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She is an enabler. He needs to go to a Reformers Unanimous meeting which is an addiction support group held at churches worldwide.
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Call APS and have them investigate
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