My husband has dementia, but for right now he doesn't need to be in a nursing home. How do I know when he does? - AgingCare.com

My husband has dementia, but for right now he doesn't need to be in a nursing home. How do I know when he does?

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He's on several medicines that are keeping it from getting worse for awhile, so he is doing ok, but how do I know when he does need to be in a nursing home.

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Yes "dementia" is the umbrella then you have all the different types as vst says all start off differently but alot end the same way memory loss. You can also have Als and another dementia mixed dementia etc its confusing but i think the behaviours are all the same i only know that Mum has vascular dementia which ends in stroke or heartattack the others im not sure?
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Grammy, you have it right, Alzheimer is one subtype of dementia. There are also forntotemporal dementias, vascular dementias, Lewy body dementia, and combinations to deal with. And the rest of your post is totally spot on too.
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Hope I haven't gotten off-base with this question asked by Stitches55, but I'm confused as to what, if any, differences there are with dementia and Alzheimer's. My husband's doctor doesn't explain anything and is hard to communicate with. Husband thinks his doctor is great, but most info I receive is from MY doctor. I've been led to believe Alzheimer's is a form of dementia and one of the same. If so, why are some patient's diagnosed with dementia and others with Alzheimer's. Totally confusing to me.
Have been told that every patient is different. When the patient becomes aggressive and threatening--it's time to seek help. If safety is a concern--seek help. If you feel you have reached the point emotionally and/or physically where you cannot care for your loved one any longer---you both need help! Also, please do not think you are a martyr and can handle anything that comes your way. You cannot. Seek help before disaster happens. If a Veteran, there are programs available. Local Alzheimer's associations are also there for you. Whether it's called dementia or Alzheimer's, it's a terrible disease. And every circumstance is different.
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Thank you !
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You'll know.

You can extend the length of time he can stay home by taking good care of yourself. Perhaps it would be good to have him go to an adult day health program one or more days a week. This gives him some new activities and gives you some time to yourself. Take time for yourself regularly, and try to arrange short trips or vacations for yourself. If he starts having trouble sleeping through the night, address that promptly. You will wear out much quicker if you don't get enough sleep.

My husband stayed at home the full ten years he had dementia, dying in our bedroom on hospice. Most of my fellow-caregivers in my support group reached a point where a care center was necessary.

You'll know when the time is right. But don't wait until then to explore what is available in your area. He may never need a care center, but if he does you may not have a lot of time to research them. Better to be at least semi-prepared than scrabbling at the last moment.
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It's really just when you can't manage at home any more. It may never happen, or things could become unsafe for one or both of you in a matter of weeks. The thing might be to learn more about options and finances, both home health and facility based, and realize that one person cannot provide full time supervision 24 x 7 for someone who needs it. Have you got POA paperwork in order?
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If he falls repeatedly and you can't pick him up anymore. Or if he wanders away and gets lost repeatedly. Or if he is hallucinating and becomes aggressive towards you. You can get an aide to help bathe him once a week, so bathing is not an obstacle. If he is totally bedridden and refuses to eat anymore, then it is time for Hospice. Much depends on your health and strength, if caring for him is wearing you down, get the doctor to send him a visiting nurse, a bath aide and whatever else the doctor says he needs.
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