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Well, pulled the knobs off the built in oven; now contemplating pulling stove top knobs. Wondering about anyone's experience/products. Mom is still capable of heating soup for lunch and making a pot of hot water for tea. Would like to get a hot plate unit BUT want one with an auto shut off. Hard to find with auto shut off. Also looking for suggestions for a microwave that requires a code to use, just in case.

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Going to try and post a response here again because what I wrote prior has not appeared, which I find very perplexing. I appreciate the suggestions but before you all jump to conclusions about what is appropriate without knowing details. And this is my perspective as a social worker in the field for 25+ years and a live-in daughter. Accidents can happen to anyone of any age and just because someone has dementia doesn't mean they can't manage, at some stages in the kitchen. She is still quite capable of getting her breakfast of coffee or toast and soup for lunch if she wants it. I just want to be proactive. Mom is rarely alone as both my father/her husband is here. As for hiring in-home help or thinking of assisted living, those quick to suggest that know nothing of the particular personality traits, or income or situation.
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I agree about having a person with dementia handle hot foods, beverage unattended. It's really risky. I'd consider having someone deliver it to her or go by and prepare it, if she wants it heated.
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There are commercial hot plates that do not turn on until something is placed on it and will turn off immediately when the pot is removed. And the ones I have seen are not hot to the touch after use.
the tea pot would heat up and would not be a fire or less of a safety hazard when not in use.
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And PS: I could spill hot water or soup on myself as well. We can't guard against all accidents and I would rather she be as independent as she can be for as long as she can. She hasn't as far as I know suffered any injuries up until now.
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I asked the question, didn't intend to solicit advice about the circumstances as well intended it as it may be. Yes, mom needs some supervision, but she is still in many ways quite capable and when she is not we will take what actions we need to. No, mom is not living on her own. I live with her but work part time, and dad is here nearly all the time...however mom has proven how quickly she can go "do something" with both of us under the roof and unaware. Dad can take a nap; or be watching TV; I am often upstairs and not down with them. She is not spilling the soup and she is not turning anything on repeatedly...not that that couldn't happen at some point, but now it is not. She is continent, able to dress herself, reads, can do puzzles...but that said tonight as it approached the dinner hour she put some leftover Chinese food on a paper plate in the microwave with a piece of foil over it. Amazingly, nothing happened. But that is why I asked for product information, if anyone knew of any. She CAN heat the soup up safely, but I want to be proactive. And for those who suggested a move to assisted living or hiring someone to come in, you ought to consider you may be telling those with limited financial resources to do something they can't afford. OR don't want to pursue for numerous reasons. Sticking my mother or father in an assisted living or nursing home would be the death of them both and I know cause my mother to rapidly deteriorate. Oh, and btw, I am a social worker and have been for over 25 years. I'm well aware of the options in our area. I also know there are microwave locks which we may try.
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Buy her an electric kettle with automatic shut off. I know you can also buy electric hot pots with a shut off. Another option is an induction burner, which only works with certain pots.

But I agree with the others, if she can no longer heat up food safely she may need more supervision.

I remember when Grandma H could no longer cook an egg for breakfast nor heat soup for lunch. My former mil changed her schedule to make time to supervise grandma cooking the egg and come home at lunch to heat up the soup.
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I hate to be the bad guy but this lady is probably ready for 24/7 supervision, either in home or in a facility. All these precautions are good but bad stuff is gonna happen with this level of dementia.
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Robin, I assume that your Mom still lives on her own? Reason being if Mom had some in the house with her at all times, there wouldn't be a need to pull the knobs off the oven/stove, etc.

The hot plate with a auto shut off wouldn't work, as Mom may keep turning it on and on, and on since she has memory problems.

There comes a time when our love one needs skill care while living in their home. Mom might be ok heating up soup or making hot water for tea, but that's today, tomorrow it might be different. My fear is that Mom could spill the hot soup or hot water onto herself.

Time to look into having a professional caregiver with Mom during the day. Do you stay with her in the evenings, or is she by herself? The best bet, if Mom can budget this, is to move to Senior Independent Living where she doesn't need to bother cooking, as many places 3 meals a day in the main dining room are included in the rent. Rents are on average $5k per month. If Mom owns her home, she could sell and use the equity.
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