How to keep my son's friend from bringing a cat to the house? - AgingCare.com

How to keep my son's friend from bringing a cat to the house?

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My friend is 87 yrs. old with AFIB, bad eyesight and mobility problems. I have been living with her for the last 20 years and taking care of her for the last 12 years (fulltime, I quit my job to help her). Her son was renting a room in a house and the house was sold. He moved in with us without telling us he had an old cat. (We had never had animals in the house). The cat died and his mother told him not to bring another cat. He did, they were arguments. He does not clean after his pet. And then this cat died too yesterday. She told him NO MORE CATS...but...I am sure he will get one. She almost fell several times because the cat gets on her way. She is scare of them. What do we do?.

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It's the son that needs to go!
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Your son's friend is just plain lazy, and he didn't get that way over night. Sorry to say, sounds like his Mom [your friend] has spoiled him. Hand him the vacuum and tell him he needs to learn how to use it.
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When her son (62 yrs. now) first moved in the cat was about 13 yrs. old. There were a lot of arguments. But she gave in, the cat lived 2 more years and die. The 2nd cat was sick all the time ( it died yesterday, I think it was overfed) . There is hair all over and he never cleaned. Because there was cat food and chicken meat all over the house we have cockroaches. I have been cleaning and spraying the place. Now for the first time the house is hair free, clean and does not smell bad. Is there a legal or medical way to keep another cat from invading our place. I was told he could not have a cat because he is on dialysis. He is diabetic and had a liver transplant so he takes medicine all day long. Instead of cleaning he spends his time watching TV and using his PC at the same time. We dislike that but is tolerable. Information about our options will be highly appreciated. THANKS!!!
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Time for her to tell her son "MY HOUSE, MY RULES". If son wants to have another cat, he needs to branch out on his own... I assume he is between the age of 40-60.

By the way, two too many cats passing away under his care, unless he is adopting elderly cats. If these cats are young, something doesn't sound right as a cat can live up to 15-20 years.
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