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She has started walking out of the bathroom with her pants half down as she walks to another room. It does not appear that she is unaware of what she is doing and is not doing this for shock value. She is just doing this. Asking her to "please don't leave your pants down" is not getting any response from her. Her issues are vascular dementia.

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My first thought when reading your question was "well at least she is still using the bathroom" ;)

There is probably some kind of logic (to her) behind this. Is she wet and going in search of clean clothes? Or looking for her incontinence supplies? Or she is "air drying" because she can't remember how to use toilet paper? Even if you can figure out the cause you may not be able to change her behaviour, it may be time for you to take a more active role in her toileting routine.
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Nothing for it, you'll have to start assisting with bathroom visits. Unfortunately, the vascular dementia means that your mother is most unlikely to be able to call you when she's ready and you will just have to keep an ear open for when you're needed. Knock at the door, breeze in cheerfully and talk/assist her through the dress rearrangement as though this were just all perfectly normal - you'll both soon get used to it.

If she locks the door, by the way, it would be no bad thing to take the lock off. Because the day will surely dawn when she can't operate it any more, and you don't want her to be on the wrong side of it when that happens (or, God forbid, she falls). Just put a sign or a post it note on the door reminding family members to knock before entering!

Another silver lining is that it will also be an opportunity to make sure your mother has managed to wash her hands properly and hasn't left the hot water tap running... ah happy days, this question is really taking me back!
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At some point, the dementia renders the person incapable of realizing appropriate conduct. Since, she may be unable to do this for herself, I'd likely accompany her to the bathroom each time and take care of things for her. I'd also consider if she if is using proper hygiene too, like proper clearing and handwashing. Eventually, all of these duties will need to be taken on by the caregiver.
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I agree with all the others... Time to provide assistance in the restroom.
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You should be thankful she is able to walk to the bathroom. Actually someone MUST accompany her and help her with toileting -- buy boxes of gloves and wipes and help clean her, especially after a bowel movement. Stool going into the vaginal area will cause urinary tract infection. The danger of her "mooning" is tripping over her pants and undergarments. If you cannot help her then consider impounding her in a nursing home.  PS: It's only going to get worse as she gets older. Diapers cost a fortune. 
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cwillie answered best - but I would like to add that maybe she is having trouble using the toilet paper. It could be out of her reach or it could be painful to her to have to reach behind to do the 'paperwork' - I agree, it is time to accompany her to see what the problem is.

We cannot fix a problem until and unless we understand what it is.

I had to purchase a 'free standing toilet paper roller' because my DH was reaching too far and the fear of him falling off the commode was very real. I also had to put 'grab bars' in several spots so he can go from one to the next without reaching too far.
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I agree with the "time to help mom" in the bathroom has come. At least she can take herself still! There's a lot of folks who's happily just do "wiping up" duty than have the adult diapers, etc., that they're dealing with.

This is a GREAT time to make sure mom's hands are properly washed. My mother will use antibacterial handwash in lieu of washing, and it's a good "short term" answer, but not a replacement when there is soap, warm water and a good scrub is in order.

Keeping her hands cleaner will also benefit her in other areas: her glasses, any touch pad, light switches, etc., will be much cleaner. I clean my mother's glasses, phone, walker and all the doorknobs and switches every time I visit. Sometimes I wonder if she's washing her hands at all!!
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I just have read some of the responses which continue to make me feel so lucky in the level of my mother's functioning...and realize how much more involved this could all get. So here's a hug, for all of you. You are all a blessing to others, not only those you have cared for, but those you help here by sharing the expertise you came by the hard way.
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It gives me n my girls a laugh occasionally(when their dad isn't home to see her hiney lol) no boy wants to see Grammy hiney of course!
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Also consider she may have pain that she can't articulate. It could be hard for her to reach or pull. Instead of telling her to pull up her droopy drawers offer to help her hitch up her britches. Stay cheerful and take the moment to give her a hug.
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