How can we keep Mom from getting out of bed? - AgingCare.com

How can we keep Mom from getting out of bed?

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She will not call for help, whether she's lying down for an afternoon nap or if she's in bed for the night. She is completely incapable of walking on her own, (uses a walker or a wheelchair) but she will not stop trying to get out of bed to go to the bathroom, or (in the case of the afternoon nap) come out to the living room. SHE FALLS EVERY TIME. She has a whistle and a bell, but will not use either of them. She's going to a nursing home soon, and I would like to break her of this habit before she ends up in restraints 24/7.

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I have used a bed alarm with my grandma but I found that the sound would scare her and almost cause her to fall. I personally use and monitor her with a baby alarm. She thankfully has most of the time learned to call out for help although the other day I once again found her on the floor as she tried to leave her chair and fell out and landed on her butt not breaking anything. The baby alarm allows me to hear her when she's grunting. I have music on in her room near her but not too loud as I still want to be able to hear her when she's trying to get out of the bed. There are others that actually come on when there is noise on the other end. Her music messed with that a lot I have to say but I honestly perfer the baby monitor because when she calls out, I can see if she falls back to sleep before rushing out there to risk waking her in a sleeping state. The bed alarm though does work. What I found was to place it behind her back so when she sat up to climb out of her chair or bed, it would alarm but it is very loud and scary to an elderly patient who doesn't understand why an alarm is going off.

There are rails actually you can even put on regular beds to help. My grandma for a while had a small rail that we put on one side but we used it to assist her in getting out of bed to the bathroom back when she could handle it. We tried putting a string across her that pulled on a simple bell that would ring alerting us. She started to play with the string so that didn't work.

A rehab facility wouldn't use bed alarms or monitors. She had a broken leg so the one lady who worked there overnight would actually put real bells on the sides of the bed overtop the blankets. Then she made sure the ground was clear so when the bell hit the ground, she would know grandma had thrown back her covers to get out of bed. Didn't detour grandma but it alerted the staff to go make sure she was ok and to make sure to lay her back down.

Lots of ideas. I hope one works for you.
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We have a 98 year old Nanny living with us. My mom will turn 70 next week. My mom stays with her 24/7 as to not have her have to go to a nursing home. She fell and broke her hip in July. She is slowly going downhill. She is on hospice now. She had been sleeping in a recliner since she came home from hospital, until about 3 weeks ago. Now she wants to sleep with my mom and hold her hand while she sleeps. She insists on getting up at all hours of the night, but sleeps most of the day. She pinched my moms face (not hard), because my mom would not let her get up. Mind you, she can’t walk alone. The not listening and trying to get out of bed and chair has recently started. It’s like she is reverting back to being a child. My mom is exhausted to say the least. I try and help out when I get home. I let my mom go places with my daughter to get a break. I never knew how much spunk my little Nanny had in her. I guess that is why she is still with us at 98!!! I am going to have to purchase a video monitor to watch her and not get up EVERY time we hear her recliner move up and down.
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I am soooo new to this situation. My mom has Alzheimer's and lives with me in my 2 bdrm apt. I didn't know it was illegal to restrain her. I used a gait belt to keep her in her chair sometimes and not fall out during her frequent chair naps. Instead, I moved the chairs closer so if she should nod off and start leaning forward, I can catch her. Also, at night is the worse. She is on sleeping med but it doesn't last but 2-3 hours. After that, she is up and wandering in her room. I've removed everything except her bed and I lock her closet so she won't go in & get stuck. But those 'bumps' in the night are the scariest things of all. I jump out of bed thinking she's hurt herself. Then I can't get back to sleep. It seems I notice a new bruise every week. I know its not all about me anymore but lack of sleep doesn't help me during the day when I need to care for her. Thanks for all the advice.
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Thank you Jeannegibbs. I will call the doctor on Monday to find out. I was going to do that, too bad it's the long weekend. I hope she sleeps tonight. I find if she has a full stomach, she sleeps better too. That night she wanted to eat so bad that I fed her around 5:30 pm and I think by midnight she must have been hungry. So tonight I kept giving her food until she went to sleep. She has dementia and it is very advanced, but for some reason she eats more now than she ever did. She is always very, very hungry. She eats a lot. I guess, at least that's a good thing. Tonight, before she went to sleep, she changed my whole living room. From her wheelchair, she was pushing my furniture around the room. I could not get her mind off of moving my furniture. It was like she had to do it no matter what happened. I can't even imagine how she has the strength to do that since she only weighs 90 pounds and is very frail, but I guess when people with dementia get something in their head, they just can't help it. It is so hard to watch her. I feel like my mother died when she had the stroke a year and a half ago. She had signs of dementia already, but the stroke made it come much faster. This is not my mother anymore. I miss our talks and the stories of her infancy and youth. I will never hear those again.
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hepi22, talk to the doctor who prescribed Temazepam and explain that it is not working any more. Ask for another alternative.

This can be the straw that breaks the camels back. Not sleeping through the night might be the factor that means you cannot keep her at home with you any longer. Exploring all possible safe drug options is worthwhile, in my opinion. For my husband the answer was Seroquel, but that certainly is not the only possibility and is not the right choice for everyone. But the doctor treating your mom must be told that the current drug is no longer effective and that this is a very serious matter.
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I have the same problem with my mom, but she does not sleep at all during the night. She gets up every 15 minutes. She sleeps maybe from 9 pm to midnight, but then wakes up every 15 minutes or just doesn't want to sleep all night. When she falls asleep at 9 I have to do everything I was not able to do when she was awake during the day. So I usually will go to sleep at midnight which is the time she wants to wander around the house. She has dementia and it's pretty advanced. She does not make any sense when she talks and has a hard time understanding us. She has fallen many times, but is lucky that she hasn't broken anything yet. Just little cuts on her head, and bumps and scratches.
She always wants to go somewhere. She repeats "let's go" for hours at a time. So I think she wants the same thing at night.
I see all the suggestions here. The alarms are a good idea even though I really don't need them since I sleep in the same room and see her getting up, but I need my sleep too. If I had an alarm, I would still be up all night like I am now. I need an someone to tell me what I can do to keep her from getting up at night. She takes Temazepan, but it doesn't work anymore. She tries to jump over the railing if we put it up, so that doesn't work either. I really don't know anymore. I need help!!
Not to mention, I have other people to take care of in my life.
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My dad is in the nursing home, restraints are illegal from what I was told, I am in Tennessee. Anyway, when he first went in I asked them to put a seat belt or something on him so he wouldn't be able to get out of his wheelchair but they can't do that. He was also falling because he would try to get out of bed, they took his bed frame away from him and put a pad beside his bed. He eventually "graduated" to his bed frame again, but with it on the floor he wouldn't get hurt if he tried to get up, he couldn't get up at that point.as far as his wheelchair, maintenance raise the front part of the seat so it inclines and he can't get up from it. They even went so far as getting him a rocker recliner wheelchair which is very nice and comfy. Hope this helps.
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Placing a swimers noodle under the edge of the mattress creates an incline for the person to navigate. some people can still climb over. I would put another mattress on the floor right next to the bed in case they are able to climb out. but this would make enough noise for any monitor or alarm to sense. if a noodle is not available, just rolling up a large blanket would work or go to the fabric store and purchase foam wedges cut to your specificiations. the choice of how high a wedge would be totally your choice. Hope this helps!
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Just one Caveat with the alarm ideas. I have them on mom's doors and the doors to the outside, and before I was used to them, I would bolt out of bed, like for the phone. The problem is ... it is the middle of the night and I am jumping up from a dead sleep.... once I fainted and hit the door frame. It could have been stitches easily. It raised a pretty good walnut on my head.
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You can't stop this. What you can do to help your mom is to get a bed that can be lowered to the floor. Put the bed so that the head and one side on on walls. Put a mat on the floor--they make a mat for this purpose...it's pretty cushioned. So when she is in bed, you move it down so that it is nearly on the floor. The worse she can do is to roll out of the bed about 4 inches onto the nice mat. If she can crawl over to a chair or something and then pull herself up then maybe make sure anything she could pull her self up with is not in her sleeping room. But at least if she rolls onto the floor that will give you time to get in there.

I did not find that the alarms worked in the nursing home--unless your mom understands when the alarm beeps she has to stop and lay down again and call for help. My mom does not have that ability now with the dementia. Just have them instructed to put the bed to the floor.

If you don't have a special bed now I suppose you could just put the mattress on the floor or the mattress on top of the box spring on the floor with a soft mat the side. The mat should have a sloped edge so she won't trip on it.
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