How to keep my mom asleep at night?

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She wake up every hour or hour an half to use the restroom. She require someone to lift her up. Tough! Her current condition is NPO (nothing by mouth). She sleep most of her day time. It makes hard for the night giver ( a family member).

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I agree that it would help if we knew a little bit more about your mother's condition.

As the situation is now, she needs an active aide at night -- that is, not just someone to sleep in the same house in case of emergencies, but someone who does not expect to sleep, and who sleeps a different shift. This can be tough for a family member.

Her doctor needs to be aware of this situation, to rule out things like a UTI, diabetes, and drug side-effects.

It may be a drug of some kind would help her sleep through the night and/or a drug to help her be more wakeful and alert during the day might help.

It is very, very hard to tell someone "It is OK. You have disposable undies on. Go ahead and pee in them." This goes against what we have learned very early in life and have practiced for decades. Could you do this? It is very natural to want to get up if we feel the urge.

It may be the only do-it-yourself approach here is to try to see that she is awake more during the day. Other than that, discuss the problem with her doctor.
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First off, why is your mom NPO? is she getting food through a feeding tube? Does she have dementia/alz.? If so, maybe diapers could be the answer. More information on your mom's condition would be helpful. But if she is not able to get to the bathroom on her own, incontinence products would be the logical answer here.
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LingLing these are all good answers and all from personal experiences, the best route in knowing how to fix is learning by living it.
My first concern would be the UTI infection as ChristiaW mentioned. If you rule out UTI. Next step, I would check medication, some cause frequent urge to urinate. Some Medication causes restlessness, and some sleepiness.
I also agree with the busy during the day activity as wendala128 suiggested. I am hairdresser and witness good in home health care providers and some taking advantage of the time off as I do the elders hair. They disappear and go shopping like they are not getting paid for that time. I have to do my job not theirs as well, this really angers me because I know they are getting paid to take care of a person. It has happened where it affected my schedule due to an Aide not being their to help elder with Bathroom trips, in and out of chair, calling me to ask questions (if they have long appointments where they sit with color on hair) every minute to ask where they are, what day it is...etc. I do it all lovingly with a smile anyway then later tell the family members, to aware them of the irresponsibility of the Aide. I suggest anyone paying an Aide to ask for a log of daily activities and how the elder responds to different situations. This is good for many reasons, so you can monitor behavior of elder, Doctors can't treat behaviors if they don't know what they are, and you should know what's going on and how things vary in time of day reactions from meds etc..
Sugar may be affected by medication as well or meals vs activities may be the cause of odd behaviors. I have to say I noticed by observing and caring for my Mom since her dementia, that there are logical reasons for behavioral change issues, sometimes they are obvious and some not.
Sometimes routine is a must, and if the routine turns into sleeping at daytime and up at night for repeat trips to bathroom, this will become fixation so to speak.
So a new routine of activities in daytime and sleeping at night could be a solution.
P.S. I myself, just started taking a medication (arthritis from Lyme disease) that is supposed to help me sleep well and feel less discomfort during the day..... Well I never had trouble sleeping before, now I do, I get dizzy and feel like I'm in the bathroom all the time now.
Difference is "I can" relay these issues to my Dr.... but with a person suffering dementia or any elder in a full/part time care situation, someone else has to notice behaviors and think and speak for them.
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Frequent trips to bathroom could signal a UTI, so check with doctor on that. Get her outside into the fresh air during the day. Late afternoon activity to wear her out helps to sleep better. The night caregiver cannot go very long with interrupted sleep unless they are sleeping during the day. It will mess them up. Good luck.
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My mother's doctor recommended giving my mother Benadryl at night so she remains asleep. He said it is pretty safe as an over-the-counter drug. He said that not sleeping at night and confusion about time is very common among the elderly. Talk to your mother's doctor. I hesitated thinking I might be perceived as selfish. But the doctor knew immediately what I was talking about.
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I agree with wendala128. Have her up and doing something during the day, and she will be more tired at night. Even if it's just sitting up and talking with her. Also, my Mom's doctor gave her Trazadone which helps with Sundowners and wandering around at night. It doesn't sound like that is your Mom's problem, but sleeping all day might be the problem. My Mom was wandering around at night and calling people on the phone so the Trazadone put an end to that and we are very grateful for that fact.
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whoever is with your mom during the day needs to keep her awake more. If she sleeps all day, she won't be tired at night. Some mental stimulation, a little bit of safe physical activity will help her be tired at night when it is bedtime. If all else fails, talk to her doctor and see if there is anything she can be given to help her sleep at night
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