Follow
Share

Many of you have already had loved ones pass away from dementia, Alzheimer's and various other diseases, but you are kind enough to continue to give us the benefit of your experiences on this site, so......

May I ask you all a few questions?

I am concerned about how I am going to react when Mom passes away, I have had problems with depression and panic and anxiety in the past.

I care for my 85 yo mother and I do not see her passing away for several more years. When my father died in 2006 I thought we would be lucky to keep Mom alive for 3 more years, but 8 years later she is still going although her dementia and effects of medications for it, are gradually taking a toll on her and unfortunately myself, my daughter, and my siblings.

I know that for many of us the stress has been so great for so long, that in a way we look at death as a release or relief that is natural but we feel ashamed to admit it. Many people seem to curl up and pull away from life as they grieve and some never get past it. I was wondering if any of you that have gone through the death of your loved ones and you look back on it now, is there anything you wish you would have done differently? Is there anything you might have done during the time you cared for them that might have helped you more both then and now? Did you figure this all out beforehand and do things to prevent falling into deep grief?

I am asking because I am the 24/7 care giver who is under enormous stress with little to no help at all from siblings. They work and I am on disability therefore the care giving was just a "given" in their book that I should do, because I am home. I have done it for 8 years with Mom and now my panic and anxiety has begun again because I see my life slipping away (61) and my daughter is graduating from college and beginning her life..... a life I have missed out on due to caring for both parents, an aunt and brother in law as well as being ill myself for the past 17 years.

I can see myself becoming more depressed when my mother dies especially since I already feel like I have Post Traumatic Stress Disorder at times from what I am currently going through. I look at my age and wonder if anyone would hire me to do anything, I find myself passing pre schools or other businesses and wondering, "Would they even let me volunteer?"

I need to "head this off at the pass" if there is anything I can do NOW to help save myself when Mom is gone. Although I am sure I will feel relief, I am also sure I will feel lonely, at loose ends, and just plain old "lost" when she is gone, because my every waking moment is spent running to meet her needs and the needs of this household.

I had thought that perhaps leaving the house now, to take a class or visit a friend on a regular basis would help, even getting some type of part time job, but to do this I need the assistance of my family, which is not coming. As a matter of fact my older sister who lives with us stays at work 4 hours past quitting time (she works part time), so she does not have to come home and help deal with the issues of Mom. My therapist tells me I MUST leave the house each weekend and go do something fun with my daughter or a friend for my mental well being, however this same sister, has told me I can no longer leave the house, without her permission!!! My reply back to her was not a nice one! She has no right or authority to try and keep me at home, this is a jealousy issue. But it gives you an idea as to what I am up against.

If any of you could or would give me advice I would appreciate it. I feel like I need to begin "putting on the life jacket now, to prevent myself from drowning" later on.

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
I think Jeannegibbs makes a great point. What will be our life purpose?

When we are caregivers, our priority is clear. The question you asked is a GREAT one. I encourage you to plan ahead, by developing interests and circles of friends now.

Those will be a comfort to you later. I heard someone say today, if you are struggling ... with depression, indecisiveness, etc, etc --- do something, anything. Take action... take a first step. Get out there.

Good for you that you asked this question. Make your bucket list. List all the things you think may be fun to do. Go on line and look around. There are all kinds of free learning, offered now on line from great universities like MIT, etc.

Start reaching out now. Look for joy. Even in our greatest challenges, there is a silver lining in there somewhere. Keep looking. You will find it.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Dear holycow, seems like a lot of advice out there doesn't it? All I can offer is this. . .do what's comfortable for you. A minute at a time. I took my day by minutes. First try to get out of bed and shower. Next day, maybe fix myself up, try my hair differently, make-up etc. Now, the biggest step of all, going outside the house. Good advice is being given to you. You just have to pick through it and find what will work and be easiest for you right now. I won't lie, it's gonna be really really difficult to carry on. But, simply said, you must carry on. Or you won't carry on at all. Good luck to you and stick with those positive affirmations. Sending you virtual (((hugs))).
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Holy cow. I just had dad go on ahead, 10 month ago I had been taking care of him an mum for a lot of years, I now have mum, an with both take it day by day. What helped us was our faith I hope Holy cow that your name is a sign of who you are ( not the cow) but the holy. We cried a lot, but that's good, if you have any kind of believe you need to strengthen it as much as you can. Before my caring became hard core 24/7 many many years ago, I had already began building up my Faith, at the time not knowing why. But I sure do see now why, with it l have been able to handle all that has come my way, nothing has knocked me down an kept me there. If l was downed with His help l got back up, an was a smarter an strong person for it. So Holy cow, just depend on the Holy Spirit when His needed, He won't let you down just believe. What to do! just build up your believing! and leave the rest to Him to carry you through the storm.
God bless an keep you strong.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

i think it is incredibly astute of you to look in the future and ask others on this site how you can prepare yourself. I too suffer from anxiety and depression and although I know I cannot predict everything in life, events such as the passing of a parent. But I find if I know something about what is coming it is much easier to handle. I am blown away by some of the things i read on this site ("blown away" = amazed.) some of the things intimidate me, some make me feel better. all are preparation for things to come.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Holy Cow, all you can do is your best. That does not include forsaking your own health and well-being for your mother. You are honoring your mother in life, as the Ten Commandments tell us to. They do not say to sacrifice yourself entirely for your parents. As for that sister of yours, can you kick her out, or is she providing financial support for you and Mom?
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I am so sorry for your situation. I could have written that letter myself except that I took care of mom and dad in my own home and continue to care for mom as dad passed 3 yrs ago. Thinking of their death as a relief is nothing to feel quilty about, they feel that way too. I wish I could say something to help you. I was told to take classes or something too but I can't. I would suggest that you start looking into things that you would be interested in doing when the time comes that you are free again. Start making a list and when the time come, dive in on it. Sending you my love.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Hi My Mother passed back in Dec 2013, So this is still very fresh in my mind. I had been my Mom's Caregiver for the last 15 years with no help from my brothers.I knew back in Sept that things just wasnt right with my Mom she was showing signs of Dementria or something I had spoke with her Doctor about this but nothing could be done till someting happen. In Oct I had to put her in the Hospital after she had a strange episode while driving.Took her to the doctor and she had a bad UTI. was in there for 2 days and home we went after that she never got out of the bed she stayed there not able to get up she was in a wheel chair and scooter chair and had always gotton up but now she just layed there wouldnt eat or take her med. So I knew this was gonna happen. I prayed that it wouldnt and se would be ok. Dec 1st I put her back in the Hospital this time they said she had mild demetria within a day she didnt know me she just kept calling out for her mother which i had to become to keep her calm on dec5 they told me she didnt have long and the next day she was gone at 330am she stop breathing i was right there. as far as now everybody will say it will get easier. It hadnt for me yet. I cry everyday. I feel Im depressed but dont know what to do. A friend told me this everybody wil tall you to take it one day at a time. Im gonna say this (Sometimes you half to take it a moment at a time) This has turned out to be true.I feel like Im all alone now seems like everybody that said they would be here for me is not here. Everybody grives differently so just give yourself sometime I have spoken with several people that have lost there parents some for 10 yrs or more and they still grieve. Yes I think getting out the house now and especially afterwards will help its when I home that I breakdown. Sorry if I have ramble on make you find peace with in you.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

The things I've done since the passing of my Mom:

Went to bereavement group at Catholic church in my neighborhood, even though I'm not Catholic. It was very helpful for me. Others said it didn't help, so I think its a matter of how open we are to the 'help'. When it was over, I wished it continued.

So, I keep coming to this site and hope to help others with my experience.

Signed up for exercise classes. Community classes are very inexpensive and they are populated with people over age 55 and everyone is lovely. The workouts are gentle.

Joined a gym where it's populated with much younger people and everyone is very friendly. The workouts are challenging and I just do my best.

Yoga, gentle/therapeutic level only. This helped me relax and think about my sons.

Now, it's a year and a half later and I've signed up for community school classes. Drawing, how to keep resolutions, healthy cookies was not so healthy, but I will keep trying to find interesting things to learn.

I go to everything the library offers for free, particularly in the evenings.

I joined all three book clubs at my library. I don't always like the book choices, so I am looking into the book clubs at other libraries. I have read stories about North Korean prison camps and suicides and murders, but have decided to only read books that are GOOD!, healthy, up beat, positive, constructive and teach me something amazing about the world.

All this is a long way of saying, my family and friends who are still working and have young families got tired of talking about my Mom very fast. It was helpful to get out of the house, to move my body and to read and to stimulate my mind.

Life has moved on. I still miss her, but I'm happy that she knows I loved her and that I took good care of her until the end. Her words stay with me and she is in my heart and in my mind. I'm blessed with good memories.

However, as I've gotten older it has become increasingly difficult for me to stay healthy, so I have to get up and get moving Every Day!

When I wake up in the morning I say, "I'm lucky, I'm lucky, I'm lucky." I'm lucky for the challenges that have come my way, because they are a puzzle for me to solve and I am lucky for all of the blessings. I'm lucky that the sun shines and I'm lucky that the rain waters the flowers that will come in the spring.

I wish you lots and lots of luck and blessings as well. I am sure you will find them all around you if you just keep looking for them and as they say, keep moving forward.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

I personally think you need to get your mother into an assisted living home. My husband died on Feb 1 and he was in a wonderful home. I did everything I could to make him comfortable and stimulate his mind. I had lost him to alzheimers a long time ago and I was with him everyday the week he died. All the kids came and he waited for the one who was away to get there before he died. I am sad and am comforted by all the nice things people said about him but I am not devastated with grief. I is a relief to have him out of his life with little quality. ACtually, after a few weeks I have more energy than I have had in months. I think I was more stressed than I realized. I have dealt with depression and anxiety in the past and I think you will be fine.Let yourself grieve and then take care of you. GEt out and do the things you couldn't before and above all don't feel any guilt. YOu have done the best you can.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

I just went through this in October. I took care of my mom for 10 years after my dad died. They lived in a duplex with us. It was mostly myself, my husband and daughter doing her care until we could not take care of her appropriately anymore. It was a relief when she passed because she was my every thought a milliion times a day and through the nights. I had a camera to watch her from work and checked on her throughout the day. I would wake in the middle of the night and check the camera to see if she was sleeping. I never went anywhere after work because I knew she needed to eat and needed her meds. I felt guilty because she was so lonely during the days and when we came home from work and she came downstairs to visit and just get human interaction, we all became irritated because we just wanted to get dinner and do laundry and our own things at night. When she passed I would come home from work and do my normal things and then by 6:30 or so I was sitting in my chair feeling guilty for having nothing to do. I expressed this to a co-worker and her words have stayed with me. She said "that's called living and that is something you have not done for yourself in long time. Enjoy it and you deserve it". How right she was! How right she was.

My advice to you is do the best you can but the most important thing is to take care of yourself first. You MUST have an outlet because it puts things in perspective. There is only so much you can do and give of yourself. I had a couple mini nervous breakdowns at the end of my care for her at home. Finally one day I just knew I had to put her into care because my own health and family was suffering to try to take care of someone that needed more care than we were capable of giving. Don't beat yourself up and don't get depressed.

Looking back you ask what would I have done differently? I would have given mom more of my personal time and not been so selfish. I would have put her into care sooner for her and I both and not felt so guilty. I would have loved her more and tried to be quick not to anger. I would have imagined myself in her position with end stage dementia and not knowing what was happening to me and just looking for a trusted face to know that I was cared for and loved. I would not beat myself up with guilt for not being able to do it all. I should not have let lazy siblings who tried to control my life get to me. I would have been the strong woman my mother was and whom she raised the same way.

Be strong and accept that when she passes she is so much better off. I cried very little when my mom died because I knew she was so much better off and she didn't want this earhtly life anymore because the life she knew was stripped away from all of us by the dreadful, debilitating disease of dementia.

Blessed are all of us who have the opportunity to take care of those we hold in our hearts always. You will look back and feel so good that you chose to take care of her and did your best. Hopefully at the end of our own lives someone will feel that way for us! God Bless and Good Luck always......
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

You already thought this was just for 3 years, now it's 8. Don't miss spending time with your daughter. If your therapist tells you to get out to do something fun at least once a week, why not just do it? Don't wait for your sister or anyone else to help. They obviously aren't going to. As others suggested, find someone to come in. Even though this might be for your peace of mind, it is my opinion that if the caretaker costs money that it should come out of Mom's money, too. After all, you're giving her all your time and I just think it sounds fair for her to pay for the time that you have someone else take care of her.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

I lost my dad a few years ago due to Parkinson's. My mom is 87, and frail, but her mind is still sharp. I was also a caregiver to a child who was diagnosed as severely clinically depressed. Here is my advice to you. Take care of yourself now. Get out and go for walks if you can. Eat/sleep well. Recognize you will grieve, but make the choice NOW before it happens, to grieve and move on. Your parents don't want you to be depressed after they're gone. They want you to be happy in this life. I miss my dad every day. But I choose to remember him with great love, and cherish my mom while I still have her. The choice is up to you to do the same thing.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

"Caregivers tend to forget a very important thing.....themselves ".
(All of us need to do this, if I could only practice what I Preech )!

Lost my mom when I was 29, she was only 56. Lost my only brother when I was 24, he was only 31. My dad when I was 14, he was 42.
(and a ton of others as well ).

Now in my 40's trying to "practice what I'm preaching", easier said than done, but I am working on it

What I do "to cope" with them not being around anymore, is imagining they are all on vacation .... And I missed the plane! But one day, I'll catch my flight, but not right now ".

First ask your very young self (61) which you are...."What things do I enjoy/like"? baking? crafts ? Children? Think hard on things "you really enjoy".....Because you need to go do them when she does pass.

(Shell be ok.....and shell be the mom you knew before her illnesses , so feel comfort on that )!

But you must "finally" take care of you :)

And do what I'm telling you...."Go take classes , volunteer at schools/hospitals , join a craft group, gardening , etc" whatever it is you enjoy Hun ......"You need to live your life, and your mom, she'll be "whole again"....and you'll see her one day, "you missed the plane you'll catch up when your suppose too, but not now....time to live life for you for awhile "!

(They are never far once they pass.....so never fret on that)!

I now am on my last parent (father in law....toughest one yet, memory going /cancer/diabetes/etc ).....but "darn it.....I wanna take classes, and do a ton of other things"....and trying to focus hard on that .

"All of you caregivers must do this as well"!

So...."start thinking on everything you love to do or want to do, and start looking into how to do them & get yourself semi ready Hun" :)

Blessings to all of you !
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I think what I would do is as someone else mentioned. Find a caretaker place and have them come in when you need a break. Start with your office of aging and they can help out. I just recently scheduled someone to come in and stay with my dad while I can take my mother/daughters on our yearly traditional 5 hour day looking at flowers. He is not bed ridden but has some dementia and I don't want my mom to sacrafice a day out because she definitely needs it. You need to take care of yourself, otherwise your other siblings will have to step in whether they like it or not. Get some outside help to help you. it will help with your depression.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Why are you worrying about this now?

To me, this is a symptom of an underlying condition of allowing your mind to dwell on and dread the future. You can't control what happens any more than you can go backwards in time and change past experiences about which you also may be obsessing.

Actual, unpredictable future circumstances will determine what to do.

Meanwhile, learn to live in and give thanks for the current moment. Live your best life right now because that's all that truly exists for any of us. God bless.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

The longer I live and experience very stressful events, the more I am convinced you can talk yourself into a depression. Stop it before it starts! And for heaven sake, what are you worrying about a depression when your mother hasn't even passed? You could very well talk yourself into a heart attack and die BEFORE her. So live each day with a positive attitude, and tomorrow will take care of itself. Stop over analyzing how you will feel. Maybe you will be glad as most of us are because we know the pain and suffering of our loved one is ended and so are our caregiving days. You are in charge of making yourself happy and you can use your brain for happiness or depression. The choice is yours.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

When a loved one is in this condition, death is a Blessing, treat it that way and your transition will be much better. She is not the same Mom you grew up with and remember. She in effect died to you when she had advanced Dementia. She will escape from that condition when she dies.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

You will always probably grieve your parent's death (I still do 6 years later, but it's far less intense and only occasionally if something reminds me of him, and those things can be odd!) but the best thing is you're getting yourself ready for it and trying to find ways to take care of yourself. Maybe you too can be a few hours late sometimes? Missed the bus, did you? Couldn't find parking? Your watch stopped? You didnt' realize the time? This is no crime! Your sister will just have to pick up her efforts and remember, she should be thanking YOU for all you have done so far!
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

HC, I think you are going to be just fine. You are doing your best now and you seem realistic enough not to have regrets that you weren't perfect. (She wasn't a perfect mother, either. We are all human.)

I think your best preparation is to get yourself as healthy as you can now. It sounds like you are seeing a therapist. That is great! Continue that, and do your best to follow the advice that makes sense to you. (Get some in-home help! Get out!) Get your panic attacks under control now. Treat your depression now.

Remember that grief is not pathological. Grief is normal, and it gradually diminishes. Our caregiving situations are not "normal." and our grief is apt to be complicated, too. Continue to see your therapist after Mom dies. Don't expect to avoid grieving, but talking to a counselor can help you separate normal grief from anxiety and depression which need treating.

(I'm saying these things based on my own experiences. Yours may be different.)

I had a long list of things I wanted to do again after I was no longer tied to caregiving. In the year since my husband died I did do many of them, but not nearly as many as I expected to do. Partly that was for lack of money, and partly lack of energy. I'm glad I did the things I did do. It isn't all-or-nothing. Give yourself time to get back into a non-caregiving pace of life.

I feel like I was recovering from two things: the death of my life partner. The loss of my purpose and focus. This takes time. Don't let anyone pressure you or bully you to recover at an uncomfortable pace.
Helpful Answer (5)
Report

Eyerishlass: Thank you so much for your words of wisdom! I know that no matter how much we prepare for the impending death of anyone, when it actually happens, we find out we were not totally prepared. I do think that I had already mentally prepared for my fathers death and I did know that I had been a good daughter and had done everything for him that I could do. After he passed, I wrote his Eulogy, I wrote and printed out his .....what would you call them, the Funeral Schedule? I keep thinking brochure and know that isn't right but cannot think of the correct word. I found pictures for my niece who put together a beautiful digital montage that was shown during the service. My father was a funny, light hearted, man who never met a stranger. I started to say that I don't think I ever grieved him because I always felt he was still here. Mom and I did a lot of work in the back yard and I kept finding heart shaped rocks, with each one I found I would simply say..."I love you too Dad!" The one thing that did happen which surprised me greatly, was when he died, everything went from color to black and white. I absolutely remember that as if it just happened....at some point the color came back but I could not tell you when.

With Mom it is going to be different because I have personally invested so much time and work and it has gone on for so many years..... I am afraid of losing myself to depression because there is nothing to fill the gap. You had work to return to, which is something I wish I had at least part-time. I have that feeling that I need to get myself set up with something or some place to be able to turn my attention to. It's not that I do not want to grieve her, but I do not want to lose myself in some despair that will only keep me from living what is left of my life.

I am sorry that you missed seeing your father that night, but I am very glad to know that you did not let that thought overwhelm you, but accepted it as this is the way it was meant to be.

A young woman I worked with had her father in the hospital dying from AIDS. He just kept hanging on and she did not know how he could. She found out he was afraid to die since he was Catholic and homosexual and felt he would go to hell. His brothers and sisters had not come to see him either. She got a Priest to come and give him his last rites and asked his family to please come and see him so he could be at peace, which they did. As they were leaving she walked them to the elevator and thanked them all for coming, when she returned to his room, he was gone. He was ready, he had said his goodbyes, and I Love You's. She had been with him every single day for 3 weeks and in the matter of less than 10 minutes he was gone. I think he chose that particular time.

Theresa911: Wow the relationship you had with your MIL was fantastic. I hope your husband knows what a special woman you are!!!!!!!!! I absolutely love the fact that you drove over to make sure her makeup and hair were nice before she was taken.....what a blessing you are!!!

You are right about the emotional and mental stress being the worst. I am sure that is why my panic and anxiety has begun again, I have reached the end of my rope. I am in the process of checking with agencies and organizations to find some in home help, so I can leave the house on a regular basis without having my older sister "rake me over the coals!"

Thank you both again, I greatly appreciate hearing from you!
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Dear eyerishlass, wow, the very same thing happened to me. I had been visiting my MIL in the nursing home every other day for close to two years. We were so close that she referred to me as her "daughter", not DIL. I was closer to her than my own Mother and treated me better. I wasn't feeling well, in fact I was fighting the flu at the time she passed. I didn't go visit that week for fear of spreading it to some of the other residents. The week she slowly crossed over was hard on me. The night we received the call it was one-thirty in the morning. I felt such a feeling of guilt, but said to myself that I know she did it on purpose in order to spare me. That's how she was. What I did do, was get in my car and drive over before anyone whisked her away. I brought with me a small make up bag and went in to say my goodnight to her and proceeded to fix her hair and "spruce" her up a bit. I know I would want someone to do that for me. And, before the dementia hit hard, she wouldn't step out of her house unless she was done up. That was my final gift to her. She left a hole in my heart that can never be filled. But, she left a lot of love there too.
Helpful Answer (4)
Report

I've been in your exact situation the only difference is that I was caring for my MIL. First, you are never really prepared for the passing of a loved one. No matter what u tell yourself. I too am/was on disability while caring for her and it took a huge toll on my physical and mental health. Sometimes I think the emotional and mental stress is waaaay more taxing and difficult to recover from. And, I wouldn't be surprised if u did have a form of PTSD as a result. My answer or suggestion to u is this, find a home care company that can come in two or maybe three times a week for only a few hours a day to help. Please don't play the woulda shoulda coulda game with yourself? As long as u can look yourself in the mirror each day and feel good about what u are doing, give yourself a huge pat on the back. Most siblings these days aren't willing to do what u do. So great job my friend. And, btw, don't feel guilty if the thought of "sometimes I wish she'd pass already, cuz I'm tired", crosses your mind. It is totally and completely normal to feel this way. And, this is a great way or place to vent, and not feel guilty about anything. We've all been in your shoes and walked that same road. Good luck to you. (((hugs))).
Helpful Answer (4)
Report

I cared for my dad in my home for 5 years until he had to go into a nursing home. He lasted 6 months and died last May. The last time I cried from missing him and from grief was....3 days ago.

While I cared for my dad and while he was in the nursing home I wanted to make sure that after he died I would not have regrets. I did the same with my mom but my dad was more recent so that's why I'm talking about him and not my mom.

We knew my dad was dying. He had lost his mind and was on hospice. The last week of his life I took off work and was with him everyday. The day I went back to work, a Saturday, I worked 12 hours. It occurred to me to stop off at the nursing home on my way home and see him but I didn't. I was tired, I had been there all week and I had another 12 hour shift scheduled the next day. After I got home I grabbed a quick shower and called the nursing home to check up on him. I was told that they were getting ready to call me. He had died half an hour ago. Had I stopped off to see him I would have been with him when he died. I guess that would horrify a lot of people but I know in my heart that I did everything for him that I could, that I needed to get back to work after being with him all week, and that things happened the way they were supposed to happen. I guess I could have used that to beat myself up over and over but I haven't.

As for how it's been since he died? I'm not ashamed to admit that there is relief. Things were so bad for him at the end and the stress was unimaginable (meaning I could have never predicted that I could experience such stress every single day, day after day). So yeah, there was relief. After all the arrangements were made and everything like that was done I was numb for a while. Yes, I missed him but as I said things for him were so bad at the end. I didn't really go into a depression at that time as I expected I just carried on with life and it was a new life because I had been my dad's caregiver for so long. When he went into the nursing home I moved from the house we shared and got a job so that stuff was already in place and I just went on without him. But each time I think of him I get a pain in my heart. An actual pain in my heart. And when things aren't going well in my life for whatever reason I think of him and I miss him so very much. He was a good, good man and had always been a wonderful father.

As for what you can do now to make the landing easier for you I can't imagine what there is to do. Some of us grieve while our loved ones are still alive. I know I did but it wasn't the same as when he died. If there was something that could be done I think everyone would do it but we have to feel it. We have to go through it. There's no way around it but right through it. Sometimes I miss my dad more than other times and at times, for whatever reason, that grief is right there at the surface, even after all these months.

Just be a good caregiver, realize that you're human and that you're not perfect. Make choices that won't come back to haunt you later. That's all I can tell you. Just do right by your mom and you won't have any regrets. And if you find yourself with regrets after she's gone be realistic. Looking in the past at our actions isn't always reliable. Don't get into a whole self-pity thing. Be reasonable. Do I wish I had stopped off at the nursing home on my way home from work the night my dad died? Absolutely. But I didn't and I had no clue he was going to die that night and I had been with him almost 24/7 for a week and I had to get back to my life and that meant getting back to work. That's life. I don't beat myself up about it.

Just be a good daughter and I think you'll be fine. It's ok to be sad and it's ok to feel grief and it's ok to be depressed after a loved one dies. 10 months later and I cried like a baby Friday night over the loss of my dad. It's hard. But we all have to go through it.
Helpful Answer (8)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Subscribe to
Our Newsletter