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My grandmother is in a nursing home. What can I do to help keep her mind stimulated? She is 100 years young with no medical problems

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A great way to rid my coffee table (huge) of old magazines is to donate them to the Nursing Homes around town. The residents love them. Leave some on the central table in the main room, and walk around to the rooms in the evening offering them and using their titles or subject matter...." Popular Science" , "Traditional Home". "Discover", "Popular Mechanics". "Elle Decor" , "Sports Illustrated", you name it, I have it.....had it. Staff will dispose of them when they are no longer useful.
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I think your grandmother would enjoy the new memory game called Happy Days. Realistic, fine art by Sarah S. Weber from early 1900's. Only found at Memory Jogging Puzzles.

What is unique & fun about this game, you and your grandmother most likely have done these outdoor activities when you were younger, such as: flying a kite, roller skating, catching butterflies (just a few) and you will both enjoy the time together reminiscing. Fun stuff and great memory and brain exercise.
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My mother has Alzheimers and goes to an adult day care twice a week (thank heavens for CT's Home care for elders program!) where they have all sorts of activities that she doesn't remember but she does remember that she enjoyed herself! Emotional memory lasts a lot longer that regular memory.
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My mom was in recently for hip surgery rehab - she also has Alzheimers so she does not stay tuned in - but I always would see what the activities of the day were - few times a week Bingo - also people would come in for sing alongs - Bunco - they even had a Hawaiian Family night - buffet and dancers - I can't say she enjoyed them - and alot of the time she did not but I took her anyway and tried to get her to join in - usually she didn't but she was there!! It is important to do that and nice that you are concerned - good luck - it's also a good way to meet and get to know the residents or patients and staff and families.
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My 98 yr. old independent neighbor drives her car daily to the country club, goes to church, plays a mean hand of bridge and maintains her dress, home and self in prestine condition. She is VERY smart still. She has a few ailments, but keeps a positive attitude and busy. I am surprised your loved one is in a nursing home with no medical problems? Expensive too!
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I agree it is wonderful her being in good health and 100. Most nursing homes have activities, I would make sure she is participating in those, getting out of her room and socializing.

She would probably enjoy any activities she did younger, such as puzzles and playing cards. Snap is a good one, it is similar to gossips.

Do some web searches, you will find what you are looking for.
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You say she is 100 years young and no medical problems and in a nursing home. A shame she is in a nursing home because it seems she is in good condition. Some look at the age and just assume that there is diminished capacity. Make her feel vital and needed. Make her think and learn. Challenge her to the fullest. Treat her like the wise person that she likely is. Get her involved with younger folks outside the nursing home setting as much as possible. Of course if health deteriorates, mental and or physical adjustments can be made. Don't fear giving her something to be concerned about even to the extent of reasonable worry. If possible get her away from the folks who really do need to be in the nursing home as much as possible. Fill her with love and respect.
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Magazines! I drop off magazines at the various nursing homes around town, and they love it! The staff disposes of them after a month and then I carry over some more.
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I liked the photos idea, maybe some scrap booking with the pictures! That way she can work with colors, etc. I thought would be unique to take a laptop & tell her you would like to journal her life, after all when she is gone you will not be able to do that! Just her age alone is unique! She could probably tell you about the first vehicle she remembers, etc. I also liked the coloring idea also as well as the cross word puzzles. At cracker barrel restaurants is a little triangle shaped game with golf tees in it, she might like to play that or checkers might be easier to handle! Good luck! M from Illinois
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She may be happy just to sit and talk with you now and then too, about her life and yours. After all, that is a lot of memories...
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Bless her heart! I would get yarn scanes (sp) and have her roll them into balls of yarn, or can she knit? My grandmom used to crochet loops on hangers so clothes wouldnt slide off, she has been gone 32 years and I still love them. Would she be able to do photo albums with thiose fancy decorations you can buy? There is lots of books on this , try amazon, good luck!
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I find photo albums are good,it stimulates their mind,and it makes them use their brain, working out who everyone is.
My Mum can't read,knit,or concentrate on TV anymore.
She has Dementia.Also looking at Picture books together.
Also in the UK.there is a childs card game called "snap"you put cards down,and match them,we have a lot of fun playing that.
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How about having her color? Watch Turner Classic Movies and have her sing along or tell you stories about the movies and how she remembers them. Be sure to take her outside once in awhile to "change the air" in her lungs. She can tell you what birds she see's, flowers she smell's. Just a few thoughts.
Bridget
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Check with your state's library for the blind and physically handicapped (http://www.loc.gov/nls/). They can provide large print books, audiobooks and listening equipment, and more, all for free.

ABLEDATA (www.abledata.com) also has a long list of assistive technology for recreation like card holders for solitaire and supports for knitting and crocheting needles.
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Keep her iinvolved in her own affairs and informed about all the challenges you and other's are having. Seek her input and advice on matters. Discuss current events with her. Outside excursions are always a means to generate excitement and future discussions. Build the anticipation for tomorrow's event.
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If she can see still she can do crossword puzzles etc. If she can't see that well, then you and her can do them together. Also, find a book that you think would be stimulating and either read it to her, or let her read. Even those stupid tabloids are enough to make anyone laugh out loud and comment on. That ought to be stimulating in itself. What about having her go through all her old pictures and start writing who's who on the backs? Once she's gone, those faces will be strangers to the family left behind if she doesn't label them for you. What about you and her writing some of her memoirs? After all 100 years old is something to celebrate, and take note of I would think. She probably has a lot to say about how things were done 100 years ago.
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