Can I have a joint power of attorney with my brother over the affairs of our parents?

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My parents wrote joint POA with me and my brother. Its not ideal because you have to agree on everything and each has to sign off for the others decision. If you dont live nearby each other its a mess. An attorney explained to me that everytime i make a decision for mom, brother has to write letter he agrees, then notarize, then mail to me (has to be original) in order for me to use. Thats a pain -as every bank transaction, medical decision, etc has to follow this process. My brother lives in CA and I in NC and Mom in VA. The only way out of it is to have one sib "resign" from POA. Thats not comfortable but im to the point that i may do so when the time comes. Once done though u have to live with sibs decisions.

Primary and secondary POA is much wiser especially when siblings are far apart or one is shouldering more responsibility or knowledgeable about parents needs.
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As others have written in posts using the language "POA over" the finances or affairs of parents, this is not an issue of your having anything "over" them. The purpose isn't to give anyone control; it's to manage and represent the parent in what's the best interest for that parent. It's a situation in which you agree to perform certain tasks as delineated in a POA or DPOA, on your parent's behalf. It could even be considered a contract to perform certain services; but it doesn't give someone "control over" anyone else.

It might be a fine distinction, but it's one that needs to be made. You act in your parents' best interests, on their behalf.
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Weikerts, it depends on who your parents want as Power of Attorney, it is their decision. If they want both you and your brother, then it can be done... only if you want to be POA, you can decline it.

It is good to have a main Power of Attorney and if that person is unable to make decisions, then the second name on the POA comes into play. Or you can both had equal power, but only if you both think the same way.
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I'd consult with an attorney in your jurisdiction, but, the trouble is that it requires joint decisions and what if you disagree? Ask the attorney about the drawbacks with doing this.

Some people go with the primary POA as the older adult child or one who lives closer by and put the other one as the alternate.

It's A LOT of work. I wouldn't volunteer for it. I found out that it's a huge responsibility.
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