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They want him to be moved. Help! They are unhappy that I have recently gotten married, and he and their father get along great , they consider him a stranger, but they have forgotten my son had been helping me for 16 years, so no life have I enjoyed until now, and it is a problem for them because I did not tell them my personal life. He has left me with a few material items and I believe this is where all this drama is coming from. He has left them nothing. Wow. Never knew this was real. Legal documents are signed and notarized. If they want to challenge the will, they may have to take me to court, so I have been told. Anyone out there help ease my mind?

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They can challenge the will, but unless they can show that their father was of unsound mind or that you had undue influence on him, then the will will probably stand. I think it wonderful of your housemate to show his appreciation for what you have done for him. I don't think it matters if you received pay or not. We all know that pay doesn't totally compensate what we go through in caring for someone with dementia. Were you living in the father's house and he left it to you? I can see how that may have caused a little earthquake in the family. But the two main points remain -- he did it of his own free will when he was of sound mind and was not under undue influence.
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I don't have a lot of experience with will challenges, but I believe the challenge would have to be after this person has died, not before. So, let them sue now and waste their money.
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Let me see if I have this in order.... as per your profile you have been caring for a friend in your home for the 18 years. Was he a former co-worker, former neighbor, friend of the family? And you have been caring for him without a salary.

The 2 females, am I to assume they are this friend's daughters? And now they want to move their Dad. What is the reason they want to move him? Where do they want to move him? Has his Alzhimer's/Dementia come to a point where he needs another level of care?

I think it is gracious of him to leave you some items in his Will since you gave up your home to take care of him, plus your son also helped out for many years, and you did this for free. If for some reason the daughters challenge the Will, write down everything you can remember about taking care of their Dad, the trips to doctor appointments, trips to the barber, buying him groceries and personal items. If you have old calendars with appointments listed, even better.

This shows how important it is to have an employment contract whenever someone is caregiving for another person, even if the pay is zero. And to keep a daily log.

What have the daughter's contributed to their father's care? If it has been very little, the Judge might feel they don't have a leg to stand on.
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