Is this the normal progression of Alzheimer's?

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My husband sleeps about 14 hours at night, barely gets thru brunch and is nodding off again. He sleeps in his chair the rest of the day and sometimes on the sofa. Noticed that he doesn't talk that much, simple answers to questions and seldom initiates a question. He can walk, get to the bathroom(depends) and and feed himself. He takes about 2 hours to eat a meal. He plays with his napkin and what ever he can find. He is responsive to a positive and happy attitude, which is very important.. I have found this makes him co-operative in getting things done. He isn't taking any meds to make him sleepy, so is this a progression into another stage of Alz? The lack of verbal communication has taken me by surprise. He can talk, but just doesn't? His questions are the same ones, where is the dog? where is my wallet?do you need any money?...He doesn't seem to understand TV and thinks the thins seen are really happening, so we watch TCM. Could this be the beginning of him loosing his verbal skills? At 89, he has always been in good physical condition

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My husband is in the earlier stages of dementia, but I have noticed that he can sit for hours staring off into space, and that he rarely initiates a conversation. He will ask me why I am quiet or not talking to him, but when I talk to him, he only answers direct questions; he doesn't make comments or offer opinions. He also has days when he sleeps most of the time. It bothers me, so I try to find little tasks for him to do to get him moving. Sometimes he does them, sometimes he doesn't. He was a talkative person before he developed dementia.
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He showed signs about 10 years ago. At first I just wrote it off to getting old, but when his personality changed(anger) realized more serious.
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If they are diagnosed with dementia, I wouldn't consider manipulation a possible culprit. Their brains aren't able to focus and allow them to process and respond as they used to.

Almost all of the other residents in Memory Care with my cousin are also verbally limited. My cousin used to be the most proficient in conversation on the Memory Care wing, but that has faded. I don't think there are any people with good conversation skills in the unit any longer.

The only things that she said on her own initiative yesterday was, "That DRINK is good!" (referring to her Diet Coke that I took her) And "I like it here. It's so nice." She also said, "I walked up to the edge and looked at the toys." I have no idea what that was about, but said it was lovely and maybe she could do it again, which made her smile.

She can answer yes or no and I don't recall, but other than that she just stares into space or looks around the room or at some object. If I didn't keep engaging her, she would wheel out of the room as if I wasn't there. Her attention span is just very low now. She's soon to be 65.

Isabella, when did your husband's dementia begin?
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I have also been wondering about the talking lately. When I visit my mom I usually end up doing 99 percent of the talking - when I ask her a question- always an easy, simply phrased one - some times she'll answer but mostly, nothing. When she does answer she speaks in a complete sentence for the most part, occasionally loosing a word. But usually she just sits there but I know she hears me. When I get frustrated with her lack of response - and after I've tidied her room, reorganized her closet, I'll tell her I'm going to take off - she'll express surprise and say she doesn't want me to go. Usually over an hour has elapsed by this point. If I stay - very quickly she returns to just sitting there - no real interaction. So again - I tell her I'm going and leave. Is this "normal"? Isabella - is your situation similar regarding talking? How long am I suspose to sit there babbling with no indication that she even notices me. Knowing my mother, I can't help but wonder if she isn't exercising some control - still manipulating me.
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Does he nap in a recliner or the bed? Does he tell you when he's sleepy or just go to sleep?

I've noticed the verbal decrease with my cousin, who has severe dementia. She's in a wheelchair, but I haven't noticed her being sleepy during the day, although, she has tried to lie down on the bed a couple of times. I've asked the staff at Memory Care to put her down for a nap, if she appears sleepy.
I'm not sure if they are able to tell someone they are sleepy, so I suppose they just fall asleep in their chair?

Does your husband do that?
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People with dementia do sleep a lot. It may be merciful if there is so much confusion. It can also be a relief to the caregiver, so the excess sleep is a mixed blessing. I like it when my mother is asleep, because I've heard her stories so many time and the questions are always the same. Plus she likes to pick arguments. When she's asleep I don't feel guilty about doing things that need to be done. I think sleeping a lot is totally normal for older people, particularly those with dementia.
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