Can someone tell me if this is still stage 1 Alzheimer's or what stage it could possibly be? - AgingCare.com

Can someone tell me if this is still stage 1 Alzheimer's or what stage it could possibly be?

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My dad was diagnosed with Stage 1 Alzheimer's last month. And the other day I talked to him on the phone and he didn't know who I was, so I told him who I was. And u asked him the day and he was unaware of it. Then he told me about a fight (mind u never happened) he has fallen twice. Legs ankles and hands are swelling. Memory loss. Talking about my grandmother who has passed away. He is agitated. Please and thank you.

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I've heard from my dad. And my dad has had congestive heart failure ever since i was like in middle school and I'm 26 now. Plus it runs in the family pretty bad. I filled out a advantage program application for nurses to go to his house and check on him and stuff. They can help get him into a nursing home or living center which will help me out and take some stress off of me. I'm calling his doctor tomorrow again.
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Walter, what's going on is dad alright? We are worried let us know when you can
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Walter, have you heard from your dad?
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I would NOT try to self medicate him! Do as GardenArtist said and get him to the ER STAT! That's necessary because you're not a medical professional.
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There are two groups of Alzheimer's "stages".
One set of stages has only three stages - early, mid and late. In that group, your father could be considered stage 1, early. The other has seven stages. In this group your father would be in stage 3, mild decline.
Check these websites for the details on each of the two different groups.
http://www.alzheimers.net and http://www.alz.org/

I use the seven stage behavior descriptions to help our caregivers and health care providers to know which behaviors my husband is presenting.

Focus on the behavior and solutions to help your father transition into that behavior.

To help your father identify you when you call on the phone there are a few options.
1) Have a recent and childhood photo (best if your father is in the photo). Put the photos near the phone. Put your name on a label for the photos. May be even a brief story. "Dad and I riding our bikes in 19xx along the lakefront". If the story connects with your father use it every time you talk with him.
2) Consider using a live stream video phone session (like Skype) so your father could see you while he is talking with you. This technology would require a computer, internet and someone at your father's location to assist with the call set up.
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Walter, Call your local "Area Agency On Aging" every county in US has one. They will be able to point you to resources available to you.

There is no form of dementia that is easier than another. They all take their toll on both patient and family. I also agree you should have him check for Congestive Heart Failure, it causes swelling. Please let us know how you and dad are doing. If he has not responded to your calls please call 911 .
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Your dad is young - in his 50's? - to be going to a NH & there may be additional hurdles for his admission than for a more elderly person. Did you mention that dad has a felony record? If so, that may be an issue for his admission to a facility; the application may have a ? on priors and you have to answer truthfully otherwise yourself have fallout. If dad has any substance abuse issues, that too may be an issue for admissions.
Unlike those over 65, he does not have Medicare so facility has no available way to bill for medical providers initially till he gets approved for Medicaid, the facility may require a hefty deposit to admit.
If you find roadblock after roadblock in getting him into a facility, he is going to need to get admitted to a hospital and then you make social work at the hospital find a placement in a facility for him....you refuse to pick him up so they have to find a place on order for him to be discharged. Good luck in all this.
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Edema of the legs, feet and ankles is indicative of CHF (congestive heart failure) when the body is unable to excrete fluids from the body. Only a neurologist can correctly diagnose dementia (as there are many types), and other medical issues can mimic dementia (i.e. Vitamin D and Vitamin B-12 deficiency, hypothyroidism, just to name a few). Each person is unique to each "stage" and presents with similar symptoms, but do not think dementia can be put into a "stage" box exactly. The brain is terrific when it works, but each brain has its own way of dealing with the ravages of this disease. Be an advocate for your father and seek out specialists who can diagnose him correctly. When you get a consensus with two of three doctors, then deal with whatever his diagnosis is, and then wait. Dementia has its own timetable. Best wishes!
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Oh yes. I would call the police and ask for a wellness check to make sure he's not in distress. Or if you know a neighbor to do it too. How far away are you? I would go over if it was possible. Give the police your cell so they can reach you.
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Walter, you might want to consider getting a life alert pendant and a lock box that attaches to a stud bordering the door frame. There's a combination lock inside; the 4 digit combination which your father or you choose can be given to first responders to entry if your father can't be reached.
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