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My father can hear the phone ring but when he answers he can't hear the person speaking. I would rather not change the phone system as he has dementia and does not adapt to new technology.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00009WCBR/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I bought this for my work phone. I wear hearing aids and this does help
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campbec Feb 14, 2021
Clarity CLARHA40 Portable Telephone Handset Amplifier. It’s $26.95 on Amazon. It might be worth a try. It plugs into the phone where the handset plugs in then the cord to the handset plugs into the white box.
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Imho, a landline phone or a cellular phone's volume CAN be increased. Moreso, perhaps your father needs a hearing aide.
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Reply to Llamalover47
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My mother is hearing impaired and has a landline amplified phone paid for by the Government. She has a Clarity brand. She hears very well with both the speaker and phone. You need to provide proof that he is hearing impaired by his doctor or audiologist. You can check online for your state to see if he qualifies.. Good luck.
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Reply to earlybird
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Yes, some phones are made so you click a button and the sound goes up so you hear a speakerphone. I have heard of these devices but I am not familiar with them. I suggest you search the internet to see what is available. Good luck. I know some phones have a device where you can see words on a screen as to what is being said. I am partially deaf and it is horrible but I don't know the solutions.
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As has been mentioned already there are a number of devices and several associations that can make recommendations. I know several people who have had success with Captel with no cost. You may need a physician's script for it though.
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Reply to geddyupgo
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KellyAnn, for help, call an audiologist (hearing aid doctor.) Even the receptionist might be able to help. They might can direct you to helpful agency, etc... We did this and found out my husband’s hearing aid can be Bluetooth programmed to his phone. We also found out they can be programmed to the television as well.
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Reply to Mjlarkan
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Most phones have a speaker phone option? I just taught my mum to press the button for that and turned the volume up?? You could certainly try that first and see if it is not to distorted.
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Reply to Emubird
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My sister had a Serene-Innovations amplifier phone that worked very well for her hearing loss. Very loud amplifier. My BIL bought it off Amazon. It has a screen and You can program in a lot of numbers so they only have to touch a button to make a call. My sister used it until dementia interfered with her ability to use any phone at all.
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If you google captioned telephones, a number of companies will pop up. Usually amplificaton is built into the phone itself. There are also a couple organizations out there for the HOH Hard of hearing etc. YOu might just google telephones for hard of hearing/deaf and see what comes up. The trouble has to do with voices, I'm forgetting the technical terms for it all, but often male voices are easier to hear than female. We have a captel phone in our household and that works well as the invisible captioner is on the line and so the words will print out for the impaired person to read/see. We also installed onto the line a phone flasher which lights up when the phone rings. Lots of stuff out there and totally understand the technology issue. I am not good with it either but the companies that install the phones have their own reps to do the hook up...although beware...there ARE some that need an internet connection...but some of the companies that provide that do a very low cost version for the use of the captioned phone. OUr old system a caller had to dial a toll free number and THEN the phone number which was a hassle, but with the internet affiliated system, they can just dial...working pretty well. Also just in case, my preference is for a company that has help available 24/7, because you never know. Be aware that if the internet goes out, the phone goes out, so I'd make sure there is a back up cellphone on a cheap plan, just in case...
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Reply to gdaughter
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See if there is a state program available to help with equipment for the hard-of-hearing.

State telephone programs, known as Telecommunications Equipment Distribution Programs (TEDPs), provide free or low-cost telephone equipment to qualified individuals to accommodate their hearing loss and improve phone access. For up-to-date information for each state, visit the Telecommunication Equipment Distribution Programs Association (TEDPA) at tedpa.org.
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Reply to RedVanAnnie
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CapTel phone worked wonders for Mom. She could hear ring but not person talking - this phone prints out what the caller is saying - so if she couldn't hear she could read what was being said. (Tried free one from state of CA but it did not work very well - this phone was just under $100 and was a great buy.
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Reply to desert192
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There are many sites offering products for the deaf and hard of hearing. I suggest that you take a look at them as there may be other assistive devices that you would find helpful. Here is an example www.Maxi aids.com. Also the Hearing Loss Association of America has a menu which gives information on the latest technology.
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gdaughter Feb 12, 2021
Oh thank you...that's the organization I was trying to think of! last year their annual meeting was virtual so I was able to attend.
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If you will take him to an audiologist and have them diagnose him as hearing impaired, he can get a CaptionCall phone free of charge. That little FCC charge that everyone pays monthly on their phone bill covers the cost. FYI, there is no age limit. I am in my 50s and I have a CaptionCall. The owner can read a transcription of the other person's words on a large screen.
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Reply to KimberlyO
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Yes, look on line.

My 96 yr old Dad has one that Rings louder and has a Speaker Phone to make hearing better.

He has Dementia and couldn't remember how to use his cell phone.

You might also check with the hearing impared institution and see what they suggest.
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Reply to bevthegreat
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I’m nearly 72 and am hearing impaired, but not severely so (yet). So far I’m able to hear conversations using the speakerphone setting on my cell. Problem is, I don’t always hear my cell phone ringing. Solution: my sister gave me an I-watch that pairs with my I-phone. It vibrates when there’s an incoming call, alerting me to answer my cell phone. The watch also vibrates when I use it as a timer (as when baking...I can’t hear the oven timer) or an alarm (I wear the watch while sleeping and recharge first thing in the morning).

Best amplified phone sound? In the car with a Bluetooth connection to cell phone. Many a time, I’ve sat in a parking lot or driveway and talked to folks. Best sound ever ...but not always possible. I used a landline large-button, speaker-phone when I cared for my late dad. He loved calling and talking with his aging siblings at least once a week, usually after supper.
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Reply to jakefix
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yes there is help it is called A cap tell phone it is captioned he will read the conversation and the phone is free to those that qualify
www. cap tel.com
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Reply to jazz1940
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My father was 91 with Alzheimer’s and very poor hearing, even with his hearing aids in. We got him a Captel phone that had a screen showing the caption of his callers words. You need a referral from an audiologist or his Dr. stating that he has acute hearing loss and will benefit by such a device. Some outside company pays for the people who provide the captioning in real time. The calls can be amplified quite a bit and having the conversations captioned allowed my dad to read it over and over, as he’d forget the call. Good luck- this helped us greatly!
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Reply to DadsGurl
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Clear caption! My mom got it free
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Reply to mlcjohnson
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Sounds like he need hearing aides. Many have a setting for telephone conversations.
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Reply to Taarna
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investigate a captioning phone which is free for hearing impaired works like captioning on tv user can read what caller is saying
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Reply to Mikegately
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A simple solution that has helped mom and aunt was to push the speaker button after answering the phone. This helped greatly. For some reason they could hear a lot better.
Remember the hearing aides need cleaning and batteries changed every two weeks. Use debrox drops routinely in the ears to keep wax buildup down.
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Reply to InFamilyService
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We had this exact problem, and got hearing aides, external speakers and a myriad of technological devices to try to help. The simplest and most effective solution was the old school ear buds that plug into the phone and then go into their ears. For us it worked like a charm and we couldn’t believe we didn’t think of it earlier. Give that a try. We never had much luck with the hearing aides for anything. They don’t want to wear them, don’t know where they are, take too much time to set up and place on/in their ears when they get a call etc. Just keep the ear phones on their table and plug them in if they get a call. For us, it has worked like a charm. Good luck. It is a frustrating problem. The outcome of not fixing it, is that people will call much less or stop calling at all because it’s impossible to communicate.
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Reply to rygmyr
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I am responding to you don't think Dads hearing aides work for him.

They may not, hearing aides really don't help someone who is completely deaf. My DH just had to switch providers because of insurance. I went with him on his first visit and learned so much that we had never been told. My husband has worn hearing aides since about 5. He had a hard time adjusting to digital from Analog. The problem with digital is that the persons voice ur are hearing is more mechanical. This is hard at first for brain to except. You have to wear them regularly for a brain to adjust to the new sound. A small, piece of wax in the tubing will keep the person from hearing well. As will wax build up in the ear. Then there is the ear mold. If it doesn't fit well it can be uncomfortable. But it can be shaved down to fit well. If Dad complains the ear is sore, its probably a bad fit. Older molds get hard and shrink so don't fit well. Will also get feedback.

Then there's adjusting for changes. Digitals are adjusted by computer. They are only adjusted so high and so low. If Dads hearing has gotten worse, he may need an adjustment. Elderly tend to discard them quickly. Most everyone needs to go back to have the aides tweaked. You should have them cleaned periodically.
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Reply to JoAnn29
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Does your dad wear hearing aides? That may be an issue. A ringing phone is certainly a different frequency than a person voice. In any case, call the phone co. and see what they can offer.
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KellyAnn Feb 9, 2021
My dad has hearing aids, but doesn't wear them. The hearing aids don't seem to help him. I will check with his phone company. Thank you for your help!
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My mom had a Clarity® phone and it practically broke my eardrum if I forgot to adjust the volume, they have many options available.
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KellyAnn Feb 9, 2021
I saw the Clarity phone on Amazon. I will take a better look now that I know they work! Thank you!
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Absolutely. If he still has a landline, his phone company will provide him with an ADA-complaint phone for free.

My mother has macular degeneration and she was given a phone with giant buttons, but it also has volume, and most important, tone controls. She also can't hear, so that phone's tone control was a godsend.
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Reply to MJ1929
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KellyAnn Feb 9, 2021
He does have a landline. I will check with their phone service! Thank you!
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You need to get him a phone for the deaf. The volume can be adjusted for his hearing level. My husband is on his second one. One isca wall/table unit that uses the phone outlet and comes with a wireless one with a stand. He perfers the wireless because it has a boost button. You place the volume as loud as you can get it and then the boost button makes it louder.

Here is a site that may have what your looking for. Call your phone company and see if they have any recommendations.

https://www.hearmore.com/categories/27/Telephone-Accessories.html
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KellyAnn Feb 9, 2021
Thank you!
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