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I try to re-route her she will not stop looking outside. She is on agility and depakote now.

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I have been dealing with my husband's dementia for years now, and I have discovered that I have to be his advocate. The doctor's don't really have any answers. It all seems to be trail & error. So I make the decisions, and I tell them what I want. I switched him from Linsopril to Hawthorne for his blood pressure for instance. I checked it out with the doctor who wasn't familiar with it but was willing to look it up and said go ahead. It took a few weeks to stabilize, but his blood pressure is now under control and no possible side effects.

So I made the decision to have him on Aricept for the hallucinations, and it has definitely helped. We can't be afraid to speak up. We are the ones who are caring for them and living with them, and I will do whatever I can to make what ever time my husband has left on this earth to be as comfortable & enjoyable as possible.
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My husband has aged related dementia and fell last year and had a brain bleed. Right after that happened he started having hallucinations in the middle of the night which was very disturbing for both of us. I got a prescription for Aricept 10 mg. (the brand, not the generic which he throws up) for him that he takes with dinner, and then I give him 1.5 mg. of Melotonin just before bed, and that did away with the night time hallucinations. He still is disorientated when he first wakes up, but that I can deal with.
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My husband has age related dementia, and he starting having hallucinations after a fall & a head injury. I got him on Aricept (the brand) as he throws up the generic, give him this at dinner time, and give him 1.5 mg. of melatonin at bedtime. This routine has stopped the middle of the night hullucinations. He still is disorientated occasionally when first waking up, but that is something I can deal with. I keep his prescription drugs to a minimum to avoid side effects. Everyone's body may react differently to various drugs, and a lot depends on what drugs they are already taking, but this has worked well for us.
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Marys56 Aug 21, 2018
Thank you my mom was originally on both aricept and namenda for a long time and she did well. 5yrs ago they stopped giving her both,they told my dad she didn't need to take it anymore since then she has gotten further in to Alzheimer's. She has now been admitted into the hospital and is not expected to be returned home. She will be placed in a home.mixed feelings on that
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A neurologist can help too. Is this all the time or occasionally. My Mom saw a little girl and would talk to her. Calling me to make her stop doing whatever. When I got there the little girl had left. Moms neurologist said that if an occasional thing not to worry. If it became frequent and upset her he would give her a medication.
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just a shot in the dark here...(I agree check back with her dr. - hopefully dr is more than just a PCP.)

but is it just one window, or each window you have?

my mom will sometimes think something is "something else"  A light reflection on something shiny OR a mirror that reflects will make it appear something is moving.

is there a 'shape' outside the window that looks like a person?

my moms eyesight isn't the greatest, so even a birdhouse on a post could look like a person.

can you put up a simple window covering if it is just one particular window?
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I don't have that information, but, I would report this to her doctor and see if he can help and refer her to a geriatric psychiatrist. I'd try to keep her supervised and safe as this is going on.
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