Is there any way to get aid when making a home accessible? - AgingCare.com

Is there any way to get aid when making a home accessible?

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I guess this is “part 2” of my catheter question from before. And, I know this type of question is state specific. The floor below hubby’s hospital bed is in truly bad shape. The vinyl planking, at least, will need to be removed and the floor repaired. Hubby and I were talking last night about doing something to make our home more handicap friendly, specifically widening some doorways so his powerchair would fit through. This is obviously not a job for Weekend Warriors. Has anyone done the runaround of local agencies to see if there is financial help for this sort of thing? Are there construction companies in existence who could help? (Don’t need names/numbers, just need to know if such a company exists). What kind of agency would I call? Local Area Agency on Aging? Any help, as usual, much appreciated.

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Reply to Llamalover47
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I just thought of this...
Check you local High School or Community College. If they have a program (Used to be called Shop Classes...showing my age!) that teach the students building, codes, how to adapt current buildings to make them accessible they may be interested in doing some work. I am sure you would have to pay for supplies. It would be worth a call. If they do not have a program that would do this for you they may have a list of graduates that are looking for work.
I found the best Caregivers this way, got 2 recent graduates in the Nursing program that had been certified as CNA's and it was before the Nursing programs started. I told them I would be very willing to work around their class schedules when it cam time to scheduling them.
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Reply to Grandma1954
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Adaptive housing is also known as "Universal Design". It's home design principle that gives a better quality of life for the people who live there making a home more accessible and livable regardless of who lives there, and keeping it visually appealing. A mom with young children, could use this too, i.e. a stroller through the flat entrance, arms and hands full of baby and or groceries. We need to lose the word ,"handicapped" and use the term adaptive more frequently! There are companies who specialize in this type of remodel / renovation. I live in AZ and there's becoming a large market for this especially in retirement and sunbelt areas and I'm beginning to study and launch a business in this field. I've watched my elderly relatives struggle to live comfortably in their homes and then have to leave due to a fall or just the inability to navigate throughout their home. Here's a resource that might be informative: universaldesign.com/
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Reply to Debster
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Although I have no affiliation with any church, I recently made contact with a cousin on my father's side (our uncle was in hospice.) He retired from the AF and spends his time now as a "handyman" helping members of the church he goes to who need it at no charge for his labor (and likely helps others too.) He offered to help us if we need it with our mother's condo, or even the house I am in (all my repairs are on hold due to at least temp loss of the person doing the work and funding, but that's my problem!)

So, if you belong to a religious organization, ask around, ask the leader (pastor or priest or rabbi) as they should know their congregation and know if anyone has the needed skills and would offer to help. If not, ask friends or neighbors who do practice to check with their organization - they might be able to find just such a gem as my cousin!
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Reply to disgustedtoo
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questions like this make me wish that there was a division of Habitat for Humanity that would take on these smaller type projects, as opposed to total house building, and help people age in place in their homes safely and comfortably.
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Reply to robinr
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You can phone 2-1-1 or go to 211.org, which is a national referral service that most states and counties participate in. Once connected, you inform the service of your zip code, and provide other information "filters." You will receive back some very specific and relevant referrals. I had recently discovered 211 when my sister was hospitalized for physical ailments but was also abused at home by her adult sons. I was astounded how many local, hit-the-nail-on-the-head referrals were provided back to my email, confidentially. Many of these were little-known grants or programs a person would never find from women shelters, Area Agencies on Aging or even social workers untrained to use information and referral databases in depth. As a former librarian, I was blown away by 211!
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Reply to 50sChild
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Many communities have online groups that work in conjuction with one another for construction needs, buying and selling and other things. The one I'm a part of is called NextDoor. Really great source. Look into one.
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Reply to Llamalover47
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My friend got a lot of help from the VA when he was diagnosed with ALS.
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Reply to Invisible
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Another resource might be the Texas Baptist Men www.texasbaptistmen.org After the fires in Washington State 2 years ago, they came up and helped my daughter's neighbor who lost his house build a shed. He is not a Baptist. Then when they found out he was going to live in the shed, they came back and insulated it and did some other things that made it livable. They also were working with an Amish group that also helped Joe.

Team Rubicon seems to be great people, I know a young woman who has volunteered with them. I agree that Habitat for Humanity also might be a good resource.

Hugs to you and your hubby.
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Reply to MaryKathleen
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I believe that it can vary quite a bit from state to state and year to year. I live in Massachusetts and there used to be a program through the state that provided funding for projects like you are asking about. It was offered through the same group that took care of fuel assistance. Through our county Elder Services, you can get grab bars installed and similar smaller things. If your loved one is covered by Medicaid, there was a program called "The Money Follows the Person" where if an individual was in a nursing home hoping to move back home, some modifications were provided like ramps, hospital beds etc. That program has a new name now that escapes me. Last idea.....get an estimate and post a go-fund-me page. Do it as yourself, not for your dad so it's not their liability if and/or when your dad may need to file for Medicaid or Long-term care. Ultimately, my advice is to contact your elder services organization for help identifying your options. Good luck!
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Reply to lynina2
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