Follow
Share

My friend eats all day long and in the night too. I'm not concerned about weight gain as he's had serious physical illness and lost 4 stone but he hasn't yet been diagnosed with dementia so I am writing a list of his symptoms and wondered if this is one?

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Find Care & Housing
Writing a list of symptoms is a good idea. Then ask if you can accompany him to the doctor. Present the list of symptoms to the doctor and see if that helps with the diagnosis.

If you can't go along for the appointment and you don't know the doctor's name, try to find out in conversation. Then write the doctor a note for his or her records. so that when your friend goes for a checkup the doctor has some background.

You are a good person to be concerned. We love to see an update if you learn more.
Take care,
Carol
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I have a theory about this...my husband has Alzheimer's, diagnosed 8 years ago. About the last 5 years he too eats constantly unless he's sleeping. My theory is that he is doing something he can still do on his own.
He no longer drives, no more fishing, no more working in his shop....but he can go in the fridge and get an apple, peel it, cut it up and eat it. He can pour himself a cup of coffee and get a bowl of ice cream. He's had up to 7-8 bowls of ice cream in one evening thinking each one is his first. What the heck...I just let him eat. And no, he doesn't gain weight. So the weight gain control must have something to do with the diagnosis.
I think when they are stripped of so much, have terrible confusion and can't just sit all day, they will find something they can do without help from others. And in most cases they can still eat!
Hope this helps...
Helpful Answer (5)
Report

Yes
Under eating and over eating are symptoms of dementia. It just varies from individual to individual
Sugar craving - chocolates etc is also a classic symptom
Helpful Answer (4)
Report

What does a decrease in executive functioning have to do with overeating? Persons with dementia due to Alzheimer's frequently lose their ability to plan ahead and make decisions, etc.
But I do agree that overeating and dementia go together, especially sweet stuff. I have had two clients lose large amounts of weight in a relatively short period. Also if the person had OCD tendencies earlier in life, then eating can be viewed as a replacement for other compulsive behaviors.
The mere mention of 'ice cream" can distract persons with dementia when they acting in a distressing manner.
I wish neuroscience would better explain this behavior, as it is pretty common.
Helpful Answer (4)
Report

I attended a workshop on dementia last year, and the presenter discussed this constant eating. One thing mentioned is that the brain needs a lot more energy due to the misfiring in the connections....the brain works overtime, trying to send signals the right way, or to get memory issues to work. Also the brain requires a lot of carbohydrates to function. She said people with dementia and Alzheimer's may need 4000 calories a day, just due to the activity going on in the brain, and that is why they want to eat and snack constantly, crave sweets and yet do not gain weight in proportion to what they want to eat.
Helpful Answer (4)
Report

My MIL eats everything you give her and looks for more,, she will just keep on going! And forget candy.. she sneaks it and they have to hide it from her. I don;t know where she puts it,, she is pretty slim and sleeps alot. We brought a chicken lunch recently.. she ate 2 pieces of chicken, slaw, potato salad, rolls.. and wanted chips too! Oh well.. if this is the worst thing she does... Dad ate alot too, just took him forever to do it... no lie. over an hour for a sandwich and a cup of soup.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

Kaydi your friend smokes a lot, right? That might keep him from gaining weight.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

Hi Stevensmom,
I asked him if he's depressed but he is adamant he's not. He forgets he's eaten dinner, still gets his own meals and one night he had dinner then an hour later made another dinner and said it was the first. He gets AM and PM muddled, came back from the toilet one day and asked me what I was doing up at this time of the morning. It was 3.45pm. His whole personality has changed, he's impossible to reason with and quickly becomes aggressive. He fails to retain most of what I say, no longer reads books he used to spend hours reading, he severely self neglects, has gone 2 months without a shower or clothes change but believes he showers daily as he always used to do. He refuses to see a doctor so I've written all these and more on a list to show our doctor.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

I can't persuade him to get on the scales but he doesn't seem to gain any weight. He is up a lot at night and I've come down at 2am n he's been eating "supper" and 4am and he's eating "breakfast"!
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

I think they over eat and crave sugar because it comforts them..also they probably like food..and figure..I'm old..I can do whatever I please...blast the calories! Seems to be that way with my mom anyway! I'm amazed the size of the portions she eats! I control my prediabetes with diet..so I know what size of portions should be eaten...and she doubles that...and she is overweight...not good for her double knee replacements..but this isn't a battle I'm taking on...other than dishing out her food..giving her slightly smaller portions..
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

See All Answers
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Subscribe to
Our Newsletter