Is Mom's Alzheimer's progressing? - AgingCare.com

Is Mom's Alzheimer's progressing?

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My Mom was diagnosed with Alzheimers 3 years ago or so. Her short term memory has been non existent for almost a year now, but her long term has always been pretty good. All of a sudden people that she knew from years ago that she has remembered she doesn't. For example she has always talked about some people that we know in Denver, haven't seen them in years but she gets a Christmas Card from them every year. She got one this year but could not place who they are. I know Mom will eventually forget who I am too, when it happens will it happen that quick?

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Quick answer= Alzheimer's will NOT get better.
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My mother had Alzheimer's 10 years before she passed away. She lost the ability to communicate 1 month before her death. so I can't be certain she knew my name or exactly who I was. But she always seemed to recognize me and wanted me near. My mom gradually lost the ability to swallow, and was completely immobile. She had less difficulty with her memory than my father has. He was diagnosed in 2014 and has already lost all short term memory and much of his long term memory. He has suffered much with hallucinations but my mother never had problems with those. You're mother might different issues than my parents have. Just try to engage your mother in conversations. Photos, songs, and favorite keepsakes from home, are all things that she might be able to enjoy. Simple things like brushing her hair and helping her wash her face might make her feel more comfortable and give you another way to communicate. Everyone's experience is unique. Support groups like this one can provide you with different perspectives.
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Thank you everyone for your input. This is such a wonderful site to gain knowledge from others experience. I am completely new to Alzheimer's disease and try to learn more about it everyday.
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I agree with the rest, it sounds to me like it's getting worse. Your mom's pattern seems to resemble my mother's. At first it was only short term memory, then she started to forget old memories, old friends, places we lived, etc. I asked her once a few months ago if she had any memories of me when I was a child -- she thought for a moment and then shook her head "no." She frequently forgets who I am, but she always remembers that I'm someone she loves. She must remember her parents and her sisters for she asks for them frequently even though they've all passed on many years ago. And it goes on and off - sometimes she has good days and is almost lucid, some days she can't remember anything at all. You may be dreading that day when she doesn't know your name or who you are, but, believe me, after time you get used to it. I remember I used to think I wouldn't be able to handle my mom not knowing who I was, but, when the time came, I found I could handle it. Just try to be as loving and caring as you can. I try to see things from her perspective: if I suddenly found that I couldn't remember where I was or what had happened to me during my life I'd be terrified. I reasoned that this must terrify her, too. So I just try to be supportive, to make her comfortable and to try to calm her fear as much as I can. And find people who you can talk to about it, because it's tough on the caregiver as well. Hope this helps.
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So sorry you're going through this. But I don't think anyone can give you a definitive answer on this, because Alz affects everyone differently. In my mother's case, she knew who we were all the way up until about 3 months before she died. I honestly believe, though, that daily interaction with our loved ones helps. My mother's spouse was always going over, spending time with her, talking with her, looking through photos. I called her every dayI can't help but think that that slowed the progress. Best advice I can offer is to take things one day at a time and spend every moment you can loving and cherishing your mother. Saying a prayer for you both.
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cothrangirl13, I am in the same situation as You, and My Mom had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's in 2013 also. What can We do when memory is taken completely from Our Mother's but keep Them safe, comfortable, and smother Them with love, hugs and kindness. I'm only learning, and We are so Blessed to have so many Friends on this site who will help Us through this.
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Oh, Rainmom. That's so kind of you. It means so much. I think that we grow up on this planet with certain ideas about our purpose in life. Later in life, we find that there was another purpose. I hope you have a wonderful holiday as well.
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Sunnygirl - so many people post here. I've been here close to two months and have notice some people come and go and that there is a steady group of knowledgable regulars. Some regulars post more openly and it is easier to remember their own situations and struggles. While this isn't your thread and apologize to anyone who thinks I shouldn't say this here - in the spirit of not leaving things unsaid I've been wanting to say this for a while: I admire the love and devotion you have for your cousin, I find it extraordinary. You are a wonderful example for the rest of us - me, who struggle to remain positive and unconditionally living in the challenging situation that dementia presents. Have a wonderful Christmas and a blessed New Year!
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I have found that with my cousin, who has Vascular mixed with AD, her long term memory will fluctuate. Sometimes she knows her parents are dead, but other times she doesn't. Sometimes, she knows my parents by name, but other times, she doesn't.

Of course, with her, even early on, she could not recall the name of her high school or college, even though she remembered people she knew from that time frame by name.

I just try to keep an open mind. I know that eventually, she will not know who I am, though, I believe she will always like me and be glad to see me as long as she is aware of her surroundings. I think this because the staff tells me that she talks about me and says good things about me. And when I visit, she tells me that she loves me and that I mean the world to her.
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I agree. Yes, your mom's Alzheimer's is progressing. Always progressing. It's a terrible disease to have and a terrible disease to watch.

She may one day forget your name but remember that you're her daughter. Or she may forget your name and who you are but like PCVS above me said, hopefully there will be emotion she can tie to you like love, security, and safety and that you are someone important to her.
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