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I cared for my father for nearly 2 years in my home 24/7. He passed Sept. 2021 shy of 81 yrs. I had no respite care or nurses aids etc. I was his mouthpiece, cook, made, appointment setter, Chauffeur, nurse, Etc.! He was diagnosed in 2020 via video appointment with early onset dementia and she told me and him that she was going to recommend that his Social Security and finances be given to me (legally) for she felt that he was not capable of making wise choices. During 2020, with coronavirus spiking, we tried several times to put this into action and was nearly impossible especially Villa filling out those Medicare Medicaid forms online because the offices were closed for over a year. I don’t know if anyone has tried contacting the Medicaid office online or via telephone but it was impossible to say the least!
I do have POA -advance directive But it really only allows me to make medical decisions for him and protect me from any of his debts Should he have any after death. Is it too late To claim any type of compensation for me from Medicaid? The only thing I inherited was caring for my father who did not appreciate a single thing and bunch of junky furniture that I had to pay a truck to come here and haul it away. Yes my dad and I do miss him but at the end of the day I will think twice about doing this again in the future. It is January and I’m still exhausted…

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There are some Medicaid services that a relative can do and receive compensation, however the patient applies and once approved, the relative completes whatever process noted for their state. Example - Your dad might have been eligible for a bath, getting dressed, etc and approved for 10 hours a week. If he never completed the application process and got approved for those home health services, it would be too late to go backwards. Medicare doesn't pay for any substantial home care - they will send a nurse to visit (usually weekly), physical and occupational therapy; sometimes you can get approval for an in home dr visit, or maybe podiatrist...not much more.

While things got behind during covid, the services/application process was not shut down for a year. More and more was done online or on the phone. It did take lengthy times to speak to people, but services existed.

You gave your dad a lot of your time and energy. Although he must not have expressed his appreciation, the alternative was much better for him. He received care from family and wasn't secluded from everyone. Find peace in your heart that you did what you thought was right and you're now able to get back to living.
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Reply to my2cents
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Some of this information is not always true. In Illinois I was my husband's POA, and when it was legally filled out IT didn't cease at death, it never ceased, put in writing, because I had to be his mouthpiece after death, so legally it can be never ceases. Or sometimes 90 days after death. POA ceases. My husband Rip 🙏 🕊, gonna be gone 4years, and iam still speaking for him, as his poa. Medicare and other issues. And also, my niece got paid, caregivers pay,through the state medicaid systems, to take care of her mother, who had a stroke. Needed 24 hours care. She lived with her daughter then. Rip 🙏 🕊. So best advice seek legal help. In Illinois it's done through department on aging. They send out a booklet on senior programs.
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Reply to Kathy26
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FlaSandwich: Unfortnately, you cannot collect compensation for caregiving as this is a postmortem situation. I am sorry for the loss of your father and send condolences.
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Reply to Llamalover47
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I would contact a lawyer who deals with elder law for your community. He or She can give you the best legal advice for your situation. Sorry that you had this experience.
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Reply to Taarna
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https://www.caregiver.org/faq/can-i-get-paid-to-care-for-a-family-member/
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Reply to ConnieCaretaker
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Generally I advise clients to collect pay as you go. In some states family members can be authorized for payment. You need full written time sheets and contemporaneous notes of your activities.. IF there was a probate estate, you have a limited time to file a claim for payment. In our state it is 6 months from date of death -no matter whether estate open or not. It has to be supported by the paperwork for time and activities and at "market rate" comparable to a professional caregiver (minimum wage ) and on up if you have a degree.
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Reply to Kerrdl0413
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Family can get paid to care for loved ones when on Medicaid, depending on your state as it is state-funded. It's called IHSS (In-Home Support Services) and your doctor completes a form authorizing the need for care. A social worker comes out from the county to evaluate hours of direct need and then you keep a time card to submit to them, but again with COVID and the system being overburdened it is unclear to this retired home-care medical social worker how that has changed. You will have been deemed his IP (independent provider) and can collect caregiver compensation. But, once he is deceased, funds cease. I would suggest following up with Legal Aid or Lawyer referral for help. Sorry for your loss.
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Reply to rmellett2
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A Dr needs to fill out forms to help you get "payee" for your Dads SS. The Dr does not contact SS. Its a process and SS does not except POA.

Yes, it was hard getting thru to Medicaid. They were asking that applications be done on-line and hard to get to by phone.

But that really doesn't matter now, Medicaid does not reimburse for care. Some States don't pay family you have to hire from agency. Really, how are you going to prove you cared for Dad now. SS stops at death. So does your POA.

Very rarely does family get paid to care for a family member.
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Reply to JoAnn29
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You fail to mention where his social security payments were going. Usually it would be a bank account. So who had it? You were not supposed to receive his payments because it was meant for his care and would have affected approval from Medicaid. You mention in his profile that he was a chain smoker so who funded his habit?
Medicaid offices never closed. People worked from home but the process continued. You could have expedited by seeking legal help within those 2 years. Part of the process would have included a 5 year look back of the bank account. I wonder if there still is an account that accumulated money that you know nothing about. If there was distribution somewhere, you now have to see a lawyer to contact Social Security to see where those payments went.
Another question in your story was that the doctor would recommend for you to get his payments. That meant the doctor would fill out forms for you to get conservatorship but it looks like you did not follow through as expensive as that would be.
If you failed to go to probate to locate any accounts he may have had, my only recommendation for you is to periodically go to the find my money state websites for NC or whereever he lived in the past. Do this for the next 5 years to see if something comes up that you might claim.
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Reply to MACinCT
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FlaSandwich, unfortunately it is too late to ask for any compensation.

Please note, that the vast majority of grown children who were/are taking care of a parent(s) do not get paid, unless the parent can pay them from their own retirement savings.

Another note, once a person passes, a Power of Attorney is void.

So sorry for your loss of your Dad.
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Reply to freqflyer
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