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I know more now about such dementia, and i am proud to say that lately my loved one is doing so well on certain days, i.e, 1 day he might've had a bad more angry day at times, and then later will always say,"i am sorry."he apologize,to mom, and i. But then the rest of week he is doing so well...Completely coherent. Is this normal?I make sure to continue to study such,as i am an advocate for over 12 to 13 yrs,for rights of kids,family,parents,grandparents,inmate advocate,and elderly rights et.al., and i am learning now so much more about this disease. I am happy that our loved ones can yes, and will have their "off days,with light to mild dementia,et.al.,"but i am always happy to say my parent (dad)early 80s is doing better (his dr.saying than most) It is a blessing. and may God bless you all. Question again is has anyone experience what we are seeing,(When the loved one is completely happy,coherent etc.al., )as this is what i am seeing with my loving dad and i get happy each time i see him more coherent,happy,joyous.)It is a blessing to see,as for my mother.")

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I heard of that, but that is not with dad, dr., even validate such,but i've learned about that too, bundleofnerve and KITTY, thank you SO much. Appreciative of your well-versed answer and god bless you. My God bless all of us.
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A UTI can cause the dementia effects to be more noticeable. We could tell when my mom has UTI because she is all out of sorts.
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My grandma has severe dementia and even she has her good days. Sometimes she'll wake up her usual happy self and is eating her food without assistance, taking her pills not holding them in her mouth, happily talking and participating in conversations, greeting people by name, asking about the weather and daily plans, helping me dress her etc. Then other days she's like a lump of clay wanting everyone to do everything for her which we do. Then other days she's as mad as a hornet ready to sting or in her case beat up, anyone who comes near her. It's a day to day adventure and struggle. Sometimes its hours instead of days that the changes occur. She can be happily conversating with us taking a pill and she suddenly decides to chew a pill which causes her to be angry which causes the pills to be held in her mouth as they taste bad and then she's throwing her pills and food around, hitting anyone who comes near, and crossing her arms showing us she's done with anything we want her to do and life stops for a while. We sit waiting for her to do her little 'reset' thing, if it happens we take advantage of another good mood swing or if it doesn't sometimes making her really mad will cause her to reset but if not we just wait it out.

I find it normal and just enjoy the good and count down the bad until it's done and breathe a sigh of relief when it turns good again. It doesn't get any easier or better per say, just different and more challenging. Just keep enjoying what the day brings you and enjoy the time you have with him. Make as many memories as you can on the good days and understand that bad days will happen but so will good days.
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I'm not currently married(happily divorce) since late 90s.(was a very young bride)so this is my father. and thanks for your well-versed response.Good day now. We, me and my mother shall ask the dr., next visit "what type of dementia" as this info should've been given to daddy, earlier,when first diagnosed with mild-dementia,and they put him on the meds after his light to mild stroke.)Never was sick,ill anything for 82yrs,ever.Dr.said,that is a rarity and he is again doing better dr.,said then most.So we smile at that,and pray for the others."
But we will learn what type of dementia it is."My friend jose father had it."(Still do) since young at only 59/60.He still do but again he is doing superb!(He is almost 77 or 78 by now.)So i guess it affect people in different ways, Jeanne. Dad was not diagnose until again this January/February 2017.
But, he is doing as dr.say, "better than so many and how he is responding so far to his medication fairly well and it helps dr.,saying to be consistent with it."Dr.,even took him off one 2 weeks ago as it was making him(i.e.,violent outburst/yelling alot/saying curse stuff,and he is not usually this way,and dr., since doing so,as we told him is doing even better now.)Not getting that way,at least for now.)So that is a great thing to see.Dad again has his off day or 2, but rest of week he is fine, and i am so happy i am here for as long as i am staying, then heading back home toward my own NJ area,where i reside,but came down here to visit mom/dad last sept.2016,and extended my stay for which i know dad,mom is appreciative of so much.I love him so much.and i smile at seeing him do well,and hope it continue as long as humanly feasible,as yes i know the dementia has no cure and i pray one day for others,it will,as i know we all here wish for that.

We are going out for a 1hr., road trip,lil longer drive,and he love to be in my car. He drove his entire life, still could. But he is not "rushing it" and we know this help him so much,when out,also being an avid Golfer for decades!Thanks again,and God bless you."Thx again, Jeanne.
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What type of dementia does he have, do the doctors know? Some kinds are more prone to fluctuations than others.

My husband had 10 years of Lewy Body Dementia: 1 year severe, 8+ years mild/moderate, and the final stage which was pretty calm. The severe year came first! His doctor was a world-renowned LBD researcher and clinician. I asked him how come Coy's first year was so terrible and then he improved? Everyone knows that dementia only goes in one direction. He said that he has been discussing this with other experts who have seen similar cases. At that point their theory was, 1) good care, 2) good response to the medications, and 3) initial inflammation in the brain. What we saw in the first months was a combination of dementia and inflammation. Once the inflammation cleared up we were only dealing with dementia. That remained in the "early/mild stage" with occasional fluctuations into moderate, for most of the rest of his dementia. I don't know whether there have been trials to test this inflammation theory.

Dementia itself does not improve. But it seems reasonable to speculate that there may be other issues going on as well as the dementia.

Is your husband fully aware of his diagnosis?
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