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My Mom gets upset and pouts when things don't go her way,. Her behavior seems so over the top compared to the actual circumstance,i.ei like a daughter not putting a coffee cup back where it belongs, or someone accidently turning off the TV Does this have anything to do with PD?

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It has to do with both the Parkinson's and dementia. The connections (neurotransmitters and neural pathways) in the brain are not getting the correct signals and this will cause behavioral changes. Parkinson's patients do not get enough dopamine in their brains and that chemical is necessary for thinking clearly. Do not "blame" her, just love her for the time she has left, and be patient. This nurse is dealing with my husband and his dementia-related outbursts.
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My Dad has been diagnoses w/ Parkinsons/dementia. He had a stroke a little over a year ago. Currently my mother is the care giver but she is at her wits end and is ready to give up. I cannot keep going to their house and staying and helping out.Dad lashes our at her and now sometimes just lays there and she cannot get him up to move....I know that she needs to make that hard decision to put him in a permanent nursing home but she is afraid to go on Medicaid...I am at a loss as to what to do to help and any suggestions would be much appreciated!
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My husband got dramatically worse following a neurosurgery in November of 2011 to correct stenosis of his spinal cord at the neck where he developed complications afterwards and spent 6 days in the Neuro ICU. Before that, I was able to leave him alone for hours at a time with only phone check ins to remind him about medication, to eat and to self catheter (I forgot to mention that he has been self cathetering for 20 years because of a neurogenic bladder of unknown etiology). I now work 4 days a week for 4 hours a day and have to send my husband to an adult day care program since he can no longer be left alone for even a few minutes. He actually likes the day program but it costs $100 a day (I live in NYC) which means that I am mostly working in order to pay for the program. It is worth it to me, however, since work is like a vacation compared to taking care of him. We tried home health aides, which actually cost more than the day program, but my husband says that he will not have someone telling him what he can and cannot do in his own home - he is more willing to follow rules on someone else's turf, although he does look for ways to circumvent the rules when he thinks he can get away with it. Our two children alternate taking care of their father on Sunday afternoons so that I can take my weekly horseback riding lesson, my one indulgence. On rare occasions, they can help out at other times but not often because they both work full time and don't have much time available. Occasionally I send my husband to a Memory Care facility in nearby New Jersey (about a 30 min. drive away) for a few days where, for $225 a day, he can have his own room, eat home cooked meals, participate in structured activities including pet therapy, etc. Those few days when he is away go too quckly but they are a life saver. The cost is a hardship but what is my sanity worth. I am fortunate to have the resources to (just barely) afford this help but even so, it is terribly difficult. It sounds as though you have very little available to you so I really sympathize with your situation. If you can afford it, you should consult with an experienced Elder Law attorney. Since the "patient" is your spouse, it is easier to get him eligible for Medicaid than it would be if he were your parent. Medicaid will pay for home health aides and a nursing home if it comes to that, while allowing you to retain jointly hold assets if you carefully follow the lawyer's instructions. We have done this so and hope that my husband will soon be eligible for Medicaid. I may be able to get a Medicaid waiver to pay for his day program, although the memory care facility is only self-pay. I wish you the best under these very difficult circumstances..
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Dear balexander9: your situation sounds very much like mine. My husband displays all the same characteristics yours does. It is so very difficult. I am only 62, and my husband is 78. I fear, too, that he will outlive me because of the constant stress I'm under. I am isolated from family and friends where we live so I am really doing this all alone. I hope that is not the case with you...hopefully you have family and faithful friends to talk to and give you some respite. I have an aide that comes in once a week, but my husband creates such a fuss about the "baby sitter" that I'm thinking of dropping it. The idea was to get him used to the idea so I could find a job. I've been looking for over a year...the area we live in is mostly a tourist trap and a haven for snowbirds so there isn't much available in my line of work. I would have to drive to Ft. Myers for work, but that's 30-35 miles, 45-60 minutes travel time....can't do that under the circumstances. Financial worries plus the psychosis my husband displays robs me of sleep and joy. Very, very stressful. I pray that you will fare better than I...I've really only been at this about 6 months....his behavior/personality/memory suddenly went south around Christmas...prior to that he was difficult, but not like it's been the past 6 months. Doctor says I'm wrong, but he doesn't live with him 24/7. I KNOW something happened, but I don't know what. I actually suspect another TIA, but I have no proof. Blessings.
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My husband has been diagnosed with Dementia NOS (Not Otherwise Specified) and Parkinsonism but his neurologist from the Movement Disorders Clinic speculated that he may have Lewy Body Dementia. He is part of an Alzheimer's/Dementia study at Mount Sinai Hospital and I have been told that we won't know the exact cause of his dementia until a tissue sample is analyized at autopsy. My husband's first symptoms were personality changes which were diagnosed as depression at the time and treated with antidepressants. The second symptom was giat difficulties and lastly memory loss, not a typical presentation of Alzheimer's Disease or most other forms of dementia. In my husband's case, I can agree that his mean, nasty behavior represents an exaggeration of behaviors that were a part of his personality before, although they were not as extreme and were counterbalanced to some extent by more positive qualities that are less in evidence now. My husband always had issues of power and control which interfered with his relationships with bosses at work and definitely was a negative factor in our marriage. Now that he is dependent in so many arrives, his rage and paranoia has dramatically increased since he is convinced that I am on "a power trip" (a perfect example of transference). It is really hard to be the caretaker for someone like this, particularly when the patient is your spouse, the person you had expected to be your partner and support system for the rest of your life. Since my husband's behavior worsens in the evening (probably "sundowning"), I spend many nights in tears. I am 68 years old and even though my husband is 11 years older than I am, I am afraid that he will outlive me. I know I can't continue to do this indefinitely.
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My husband has Lewy Body Dementia which is similar to Alzheimer's and Parkinson's but not the same...his personality has changed dramatically. He is very critical and can be down right nasty. I have read that these diseases exacerbate what has always been there. I tend to agree with that. Read all you can about these diseases. Talk to her doctor. They can give her a mild anti-depressant which might help. When they are aware enough that they are losing control of even the simple things, they lash out...may not mean to, but it's their way of trying to maintain control. Good luck and God bless you.
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Your profile says your mom has heart condition/stroke. Has she been recently diagnosed with Parkinsons dementia? Is this kind of behavior new for her, or has she always been this way. I am sure having a stroke would make someone depressed, as is finding oneself losing their memory and finding out they have Parkinson's dementia. I would discuss this with her doctor to see what can be done to help both of you.
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