Is it illegal to lock my wife in our house?

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My wife with ALS has wandered off and become lost a few times and been brought back or took to the local hospital by police. I feel I need to restrict her movements for her own safety by locking doors but is it illegal to restrict her right to freedom? Is it illegal imprisonment? I am her caregiver but I must sleep sometime and she is smart enough to take advantage. I can't watch her 24/7. An alarm warning me that she has opened a door is just another form of imprisonment and depriving her of her right to freedom. Do I have any rights to force her to stay in our house? If I continue to allow her freedom and wanderings can I be charged with her neglect? Do I just continue to let the police bring her back? I feel very bad when she is crying and pleading with me to 'please let me out' or 'let me go home'.

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Of course you can lock the doors to your own home. If not to keep your wife from wondering, but to keep you and your property safe. I agree with JesseBelle - contact her doctor and hopefully he or she can prescribe meds to calm her and /or help her sleep. She may now need to go into Memory Care at a NH where there is 24 hour care.
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Yes, you can lock the doors to the house as long as you are home in the event of an emergency. When someone has advanced dementia, it isn't really freedom that makes them roam. It is disorientation and the loss of things that are familiar. They can't recognize clues that help them find their way home. It is not cruel to lock the doors. You are also saving the neighbors and police some worry. Neighbors would be uneasy if they see your wife wandering in the middle of the night. If the police are summoned frequently, they may insist that you find some way to keep your wife inside so she will be safe.

Perhaps the doctors can find something that can help her sleep through the night. That would be the ideal solution. I don't think wandering around the house or the neighborhood is particularly pleasant for someone with Alzheimer's. I could be wrong, but it seems that way to me.
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I assume you mean your wife has Alzheimer's (ALZ), not Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)? Here are a couple of other threads about the subject:

www.agingcare.com/questions/lock-wondering-dementia-dad-room-at-night-158142.htm

www.agingcare.com/questions/is-it-illegal-to-lock-a-person-in-a-house-when-they-might-wander-171797.htm
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PS: My wife has a MedicAlert bracelet so the police knows who to call when they find her.
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