Is it a common thing for a person to have an abnormal surge of well being before they pass? - AgingCare.com

Is it a common thing for a person to have an abnormal surge of well being before they pass?

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My 96 yr. old mother was non-responsive and aspirating when I tried to wake her to give her her morning juice about 2 months ago. I called 911 right away and she was in the hospital for 2 days. It's been weeks of almost daily being walked and exercised by the PT and OT from an on call agency and I have much increased the amount of fresh vegetables I serve daily. It is several weeks later now and she seems to be much more mentally alert, able to comprehend and compose well thought out letters. I notice she is not so cold all the time either.
So......why do I keep feeling almost surreal about this and that it's a phase of part of the journey of passing...... Is this true and normal or could it actually be that she is getting better? cadams

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Yes, this is very common. Enjoy being with her during what could likely be the last part of her journey. You might want to read this article: https://www.agingcare.com/articles/pre-death-rally-185452.htm
Take care,
Carol
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It's impossible to say if she is getting better but to answer your question, yes, people who have begun the process of dying often can have a burst of energy where they are lucid and seem to be getting better. It's the body's way of rallying one last time and often confuses families and loved ones.
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It is very common for people to get a lot better with the kind of care you're giving your mother. I have brought my mother back several times with intensive programs of exercise, healthy eating and alternative health care. She is now 104 and I hope I can pull it off again. Glad your mom is doing well. Enjoy every day of the clarity and lucidity.
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Happened with my mother in law. The week before we were supposed to take a trip for a 'big' anniversary she quit eating, was barely coherent and started to say things like "I can see the door opening and I am going through it". We spoke to the Hospice nurse and she said she sees this all the time and she thought it was 'time'. My MIL always wanted us to take that trip but when it came down to it, I asked my husband to decide. My MIL had been in LTC with multiple health issues and was 93 but there had been many times she had rallied and we knew it could happen again. This time though Hospice was 'sure'. After days of almost being in a semi coma, she was bright, wanted to eat, called us, we Facetimed with her and she seemed back to herself again. She was the one who said "Are you excited about your trip next week?" My husband said he wasn't sure if we were going to go and thought we might make a trip back to see her instead. She absolutely insisted that we go. We felt we were honoring her wishes and that had we not gone, she would have been upset with us. We had plenty of ways to get in touch and for Hospice to call us too. But she survived for six more months and was herself up till the last week. That time there was no rally. We had more time to enjoy her and vice versa. I think it might be one of the final gifts we get.
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If you have not read the excellent graphic novel by Roz Chast, "Can't we talk about something more pleasant?", then you are in for a treat. I lived with this book clutched to my chest for almost a year when my m other was going bonkers.

This thread reminds me of the page that asks: Which of the five stages of death is 'Eat tuna sandwich'?"
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My dad is 90. He wasn't expected to last the weekend of 23rd May, i insisted on bringing him home to die in his own home and I would take care of him. However, he's still here 4 months later, is back driving and at the moment digging the garden and setting some winter vegetables! He has bowel and liver cancer, a huge hernia and a 70mm aneurism!
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I had a cousin that was suffering from breast cancer. She was in the last stages of the disease and was admitted to Hospice. When I went to visit her she could barely open her eyes ell her strength was drained and you knew she was not long for this world. Imagine my surprise getting a call on a Saturday morning and hearing my cousin on the phone in her old upbeat lets raise h*ll voice ... I was in total shock. My cousin talked up a storm told me that she was discharged from Hospice (I think that's a real rare thing) and she was planning a huge party. She had gotten home the night before hardly slept and was waiting for her daughter in law to come because they were going shopping. I was in a fog all day ... a good fog but it was just surreal ... Unfortunately it was short lived ... but it was really lived in every sense of the word! A few months later when we went to the funeral and I spoke to her husband he said that the Doctor had told him that these things happen and it is like one last burst of energy ... He knew that she wasn't miraculously cured ... but was happy that happened and viewed it as almost a gift ... I don't think it happens a lot ... but I know for a fact that it does happen.
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I say yes to ur question. My GFs father could bearly stay awake. Next morning he was up walking around his old self. Dr. said he would send him home the next day, he died at 2:30am. My daughter sees it all the time. They are on their death beds and next thing you know they r up talking eating their meals and a few days later, gone.
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Yes, it is common and I know this because I worked in hospice. Loved ones sometimes get a burst of energy and the family is excited that he/she is getting better. Good luck.
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It happened briefly with my grandma (passed at 93). She had fallen and never recovered with a brain bleed. However, a few days before she passed, she managed to eat, smile, sing a little. It is almost like closure. I found my dad really didn't have that moment, but he was 69 when he passed and had cancer which took him rather quickly. He appeared to be reaching for something or someone a few days before he passed away, but didn't communicate with us. We knew he knew we were there with him though.
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