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I brought my 81 y.o. mother to my home one month ago after she became a victim of elder abuse at the hands of her live-in grand-daughter. At that time, I told my niece she had 30 days to get out. I have found out that she is still in the house, stating that her grandmother is the only person she has left and has no where to go. Is it possible to do an eviction "long distance"?

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Update: After my niece harrassing my son and his wife about "when grandma was coming home", I sent her an e-mail telling her instead of being concerned about grandma's schedule, she should be concerned about taking care of the credit card she saw fit to open in her grandmothers' name. Next, I hear through the grapevine that she is moving out. So, she should be all out by tomorrow. We will see how that goes. Again, thanks for being there.
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i don't now what state your in, but in calif. they have squaters rights. and the sad part about it the Law is on there side. i know here if you have the utilities turned off she could have them turned back on. i think it best you take some time and go handle your business with getting her out. trust this she will find some place else to live. loser always do.
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I am not sure that the "long distance" thing will work. You need to be in the area to make sure that she is evicted, leaves the house undamaged, and does not steal anything of value. I would involve the authorities and any elder protection agencies. I would do everything in writing and keep copies. Does your niece have any legal rights to the home she is living in? Did your mother create a lease and have her sign it? If not, you might try another call to her and tell her that you are involving the authorities. Send her a letter to vacate in 2 weeks or so. Inform the local social protection agency in your area that elder abuse and fraud had occurred and see what advice they give you. Also, your Mom needs to be 100% behind this plan. If questioned, will she cave in if your granddaughter whines about being "homeless?"
Do not buy into the "I have no where else to go" sob story. I watched my former elderly neighbors go through this. One by one their teenage and 20-something grandchildren moved into their home followed by their mother. Soon their home became run down and I suspect that one day they will "ship off" the grandparents and just become squatters in their home. What makes these young people feel entitled to whatever their grandparents/parents have worked for?
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Do you have the right to turn off the utilities? If you do, then that surely will get her out wouldn't it?
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