Is a foldable grocery cart appropriate to use in substitute of a rollator? - AgingCare.com

Is a foldable grocery cart appropriate to use in substitute of a rollator?

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No! It took me a long time to recognize the need for a rollator, but now that I have it, it's so much better, safer, and easier to use than a grocery cart. First of all, it has brakes at your fingertips, and it's surprising how often that comes in handy. Second, rollators are easier to use. Even though it seems comforting to lean against a cart while pushing it, it's still awkward and heavy compared to the rollator. Before getting mine, I didn't realize how easy it would be to get around, after limping along unsteadily with a cane or shopping carts. It made a world of difference in my mobility, and now I wouldn't be without it. PS~ a rollator is just a fancy walker with brakes and a seat if you need to rest. Most have baskets for shopping or just carrying things from room to room, which is another huge plus. I carry mail, meals, drinks and more in mine (or just on the seat), freeing my hands to hold on to the handle grips instead of getting off balance carrying something.
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Reply to Kantexmama
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Directions on rollators specifically state not to be used as a wheelchair.
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Reply to Invisible
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My local Arthritis Foundation had rollator that you could rent, for free, six months at a time. That may be an option you could try.
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Reply to BeckyT
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On my one it has a back rest and handles BUT that is for me to use. Not, I think, for someone to push me. It does look as though it would be possible but I would have no where to put my feet.
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Reply to BuzzyBee
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Right, cwille -- the only thing that can be pushed with someone in it is a wheelchair. A rollator walker is only for walking and occasional resting.
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Reply to Teri4077
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I have to correct that Llamalover, most rollators are definitely NOT designed to do double duty as a wheelchair!!
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Reply to cwillie
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I am completely flummoxed by this question! A Rollator walker is designed for the elder to sit in while someone pushes them. The good news is if you can get the elder's doctor to sign off on the need for the Rollator walker, Medicare should cover it. I erred when I purchased my late mother's Rollator based on information from her 91 year old cousin. I DID NOT get a sign off by mom's doctor; thus, I paid out of pocket.
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Reply to Llamalover47
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I can only reiterate the wonderful advice given here -- NO. Absolutely not. Not safe. If you are in the US Medicare will pay for most of the cost of a rollator if ordered by a doc, as noted above. I bought my mom's first one -- she called it her cadillac! Medicare paid for all but $17 of the second. I bought the third, even on Amazon it was not expensive. My mom did ruin the second one by sitting on it and pushing it backwards. She's learned her lesson!
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Reply to Teri4077
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A rollator positions a person's hands and arms in such a way that gives that person good and safe stability not only while walking but also while turning and just standing. And it has brakes! SO important going up or down handicap ramps or curbs.

My dad couldn't use a cane when he began needing something to help with balance due to years of shoulder abuse as a farmer (throwing hay bales, jerking cattle, setting fence posts, etc.). No shoulder cartilage left, so it's painful. But he can use the rollator with minimal pain.

Yes, it was a pride thing when he first balked at the idea of a rollator. "I can just hold onto your arm," he'd say. I explained to him that holding onto my arm provided him with only one point of contact and that if he lost his balance, we both might go down and both possibly be injured and then we would have to get outside help, blah, blah, blah. Now he actually enjoys the freedom he has with the rollatour. And the seat actually comes in handy for me as well when there's only one chair available in an office or waiting room. 😊
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Reply to HVsdaughter
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You are supposed to walk inside the walker space for stability but because we are used to pushing grocery carts, I often see people pushing a rollator like a grocery cart. My father is a prime example. I got him an upright walker instead and we like it a lot. Lightweight for transport and especially good over rough terrain outside. But when he used to shop, it was easier for him to use the shopping cart. He is careful.
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Reply to Invisible
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