Does involuntary eye closing during activities such as eating/chewing, dressing signal advanced stage of PD?

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Even though the PD patient (with dementia) is ambulatory, eating well but also sleeping a lot of the day, unless distracted by scheduled activities?

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Thank you Summertime; my brother, who passed away from PD 2 years ago also had the problem you describe with you brother. He actually had an eye lid lift that helped a lot. My husband's problem is different; his eyes close during activity, especially eating and dressing; he can easily open them on command. Seems to have lost the automatic/spontaneous behavior so characteristic of PD.
Best,
Trostie
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My brother has advanced Parkinson's. He has this problem. It appears that the muscles that hold the eyes open don't work. He lifts the skin on his forehead over his eyes to assist the muscles.
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Thank you "Give a hug" and thank you for the photo of your adorable kitty! I will check out PSP. Did your Dad also have a dementia? My husband does.
Thanks so much again.
Trostie
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Hi, Trostie. I'm not sure if this problem indicates the advancement of the Parkinson's Disease, but I do know that my Dad did this also. We always wondered why he seemed to be sleeping while he was eating. The only advice I can give is to have your Dad evaluated for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy. They believed that my Dad may have had this in addition to the Parkinson's. Here's a little blurb concerning this illness which may be helpful to you: As the disease progresses, most people will begin to develop a blurring of vision and problems controlling eye movement. In fact, eye problems usually offer the first definitive clue that PSP is the proper diagnosis. Individuals affected by PSP have trouble voluntarily shifting their gaze downward, and also can have trouble controlling their eyelids. This can lead to involuntary closing of the eyes, prolonged or infrequent blinking, or difficulty in opening the eyes. Good luck to you, and God Bless.
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Visual acuity is not the problem; had cataract surgery 18 months ago and now needs no glasses. This is clearly something neurologic. But thanks.
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Trostie, when was the last time this person had his/her eyes tested? As one ages, the light becomes too bright, thus one will tend to close their eyes as the brightness is bothering them.

If you see constant blinking, that could be a sign of cataracts or macular degeneration of the eyes. My Mom did that for many years as she was trying to blink away the cloudiness to see better [she didn't have dementia].
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