Would I be wasting my time trying to introduce electronic cigarettes to somebody with dementia? - AgingCare.com

Would I be wasting my time trying to introduce electronic cigarettes to somebody with dementia?

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My dad was diagnosed with COPD in 2011 and is still smoking. It doesn't seem to have progressed to dangerous levels yet, but I would like to see him cut back if possible. He has been opposed to computers since they came out and seems annoyed by most new technology in general, so I wonder if I would be wasting my time and money even trying this approach. Has anybody else successfully made this switch in a very old school minded person with dementia?

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A friend told me that she was charging it. And it shot across the room and caused a small fire. She was so relieved that she was not standing in front of the projectile or it would have hit her. She said that it's dangerous and she's learned to be careful with it.

There has also been new findings that e-cigs do NOT help you to ease off smoking. Instead it makes you more addicted. And it's even harder to quit smoking from e-cigs than it is from a regular cig. The regular cigs - you're fighting nicotine. With the e-cigs, you're fighting both the nicotine and the chemical used. I recommend that you do more research before using it for someone with dementia.
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You would have to keep an eye on him, or he will not keep it filled and burn the wick. They do have a tendency to leak, and have to be charged daily. Try the disposable ones first to see if he likes it.
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When my sisters moved Mom out of her apartment they noticed all kinds of cigarette burns on her chair and carpets. Out concern was two-fold: the risk of fire, and the second-hand smoke where she was going (to my sister's house). She had smoked at that point more than three-quarters of a century. Whatever lung damage that caused was already done; we weren't worried about her health. The e-ciggs (the first generation that look like cigarettes and don't have buttons to push) were very helpful in eliminating both issues.

Mom did have dementia at the time. A few times she tried to light them with a match. She would not have been able to keep them charged and change out the battery ends on her own, but with help this was a reasonable substitution for her. When she went into the hospital and then rehab they used a nicotine patch and that got her off smoking entirely.
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Our grocery and quick stops have then by the check out, disposable ones you use then throw away when the stop. They are $6.oo or less, so they may be a good starter ecig. Maybe he will be OK with just the ecig even when it's "out" if he just wants something in his hand. I was just afraid Dad would try to light it with a lighter!!
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Walmart has an e-cig called Fin. It is a 510. You can also find the refills at the store and at gas stations. It is the size of a regular cigarette and no buttons to push. That’s what we purchased to see if it would be an option to quitting the real smokes. The best thing may be to quit all cigarettes. However, I can stand being around my hubby again since he has backed way off the real cigs. From a pack every couple of days to two real cigs a day. He is now trying the Ego version (button to push) to see if he can put the real cigs down for good. None nicotine versions (refill juice) are also available online. Whether it is a good option for you all would be best discussed with medical professionals.
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I wouldn't do it. I wouldn't support his habit especially if he has dementia and COPD. E cigs still are nicotene and there are dangers with these as well especially for someone with cognitive empairment. Have his dr talk to him or consider the patch to wean him off cigarettes. DON'T BUY HIM anymore cigarettes if he can't get them on his own.
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Here are the pros and cons in regard to e-cigs. website: health.howstuffworks/wellness/smoking-cessation/10-facts-about-e-cigarettes.htm

What ever you do, if there are small children in the house or who visit, hide the e-cigs from them, as the liquid nicotine can be highly toxic if a child accidently drinks one the cartridges.

One positive note with an e-cigs, if the e-cig is dropped in a chair, it won't set it on fire. But on the other side of the coin, a cartridge of the e-cigarette could overheated while plugged into the charger, and could start a fire. Safety experts advise e-cigarette users to always keep an eye on their charger's light, and unplug the AC adapter once the e-cigarette battery is fully charged.
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My daughter spent about $60 on her e-cig and flavors and such. If you can afford to spend that knowing that it may not work I think it's definitely worth a try.

With my daughter's e-cig there's a button she has to press while she 'smokes'. That's the only thing I can think of that might trip your dad up, knowing at what point to push that button and how long to hold it down.

If you're successful in getting your dad onto an e-cig come back and share with us, your experience would probably benefit a lot of people.
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