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My brother is completely disabled and we are looking for SNFs where he can get better medical attention than he is getting in his own apartment. But he has a caregiver who has been with him for 30 years that we would like to be able to have continue to help him with some of his non-medical needs if we move him to a SNF. I am trying to find out who is responsible for paying a personal/private caregiver in a situation such as this.

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Thank you for your feedback. My mother just passed away so as siblings we are trying to sort this all out. His 30-year caregiver is not paid by us. I think maybe through Medicare?But your feedback helps me know where to begin looking for answers specific to his needs. So I'll contact SSI, IHS and Medicare.
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The typical long term insurance is either for care in a facility or in-home. Find out who was paying for this caregiver all these years.
I honestly doubt an insurance company was...the life time caps on those policies would have been used up long before 30 years.

My parents had a great policy for in-home care. But, it was just that ... in-home only. The lifetime cap would have meant the benefits would have expired after 7 years.
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Who has been paying for the caregiver for the last thirty years? You could see if this cover could be transferred with him as part of a care package, perhaps.
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I think additional caregivers would be private pay by the family,  especially as you note the CG will assist him with non medical needs. I do not think any insurance company pays for CG in a facility as that would mean they are paying twice for his care.
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I had a friend with excellent long term care insurance. It covered the facility cost, and also for a private caregiver.

I think that is a really exceptional situation. Generally the personal attendant would be private pay. Is your brother on SSI? Does he have a case worker? I think I'd start by discussing the financial aspects of moving to a SNF with them.
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