Do you have any inside activities for stay at home seniors? - AgingCare.com

Do you have any inside activities for stay at home seniors?

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He has early stages of dimentia and he was a professor so he still think that he is in charge.

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I just get frustrated that sometimes I wonder why I care. my father basically just wants to sleep all the time but boy he is sure ready when the girl comes to give him a bath. I know his body is worn out but even when asking to sit and look outside he did while I was there. mom said once I left, he got up and laid back down........and he won't take his so-called "voodoo" medicine and mom won't force him, but she said he did okay on it even if it was only 5 days.......sometimes I feel like just going away and not doing anything.
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The only thing I can think of is the jigsaw puzzles, as it is very challenging to me to keep my dad entertained, sometimes if the weather is good I will put him in his chair to sit on the front door he enjoy watching people passing by.
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I agree with the jigsaw puzzles. We put a lot together as a family. It may be easier for him if you buy large piece puzzles, perhaps from the toy department. I buy them from the dollar stores. My 88 year old Dad does the word puzzles where you find the words in a page of letters. He likes the ones that have a topic like cities, colors, landmarks or even fruits or vegetables. He gets the large print ones. They are easier to read and don't take as long to finish. I also buy them at a dollar store. I got Dad a subscription to a fishing magazine. He has fished all his life. He also likes WWII books and movies since he is a veteran.
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My mother used to sew, crochet, and knit but her eyesight and her dementia prevent her from making the beautiful quilts and afghans she used to do. She is, however, obsessed with buttoning and tying.
A friend gave me a blanket - kit, consisting of squares made of flannel. Each square has 12 slits, or fringes, on each of it's four sides. The different squares can be put together, by tying the fringes together.
I have to help my mother, by getting the two fringes that are to be tied, and hiding the other fringes in my hand. I take the blanket home with me at night, so she doesn't get into it and start tying every fringe into a hundred knots.
Sometimes she doesn't feel like she is actually making the blanket, but I remind her that she has tied every single knot and I proudly show it to everyone who passes by in her independent living facility.
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For the former gardeners, you might try terrariums. Plant some herbs such as parsley that can be used for cooking, and others such as lemon balm and any of the mints for fragrance. You could put mints in smaller cups or containers with drainage holes and set them in the terrarium to keep them from taking over. Let Mom or Dad clip the parsley for cooking.

Bird baths and bird feeders might also attract former gardeners' attention.

Instead of tv, how about DVDs of old movies...big bands, Fred Astaire, Lawrence Welk? ]

Also, folding towels is something that can occupy someone and doesn't require much effort.
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My husband w dementia likes jigsaw puzzles but I go to thrift store & get 100 or 300. On 300 pc I have been picking edge pieces out & he figures that out first. 100 pcs aren't frustrating. I have learned I like to work on them too but try to leave him to work it as its a brain thing I say. He is also always looking for rocks & gives them to strangers. He is amazed looking closly at the lines or shine. He brings many in & I take them out next day as he never remembers he had them & finds more. He also plays cards & a game Qwirkle similer to scrable but shapes & colors. He never reads & only watches talent type shows. He has a Dr of Education but means nothing at this stage. He sleeps a lot & night is sundowner time so best to play a game to keep him from thinking he's mixed up. He also likes to pull weeds. Loves musicals or dancing on tv. Never go to movies as in reading th brain can't remember the story.
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I am a terrible caregiver, because I don't worry about it. My mother never had interests outside of walking, reading, and working crossword puzzles. Now she can't see to do the last two things and she doesn't want to walk anymore. She does like watching TV, so I leave her alone. (There is also the practicality of how much time I have available to try to keep her busy.)
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I have a terrible time with my mom. She used to use her computer to send and receive email and play solitaire, but since we moved her in with us, she won't go near the computer. She never did sew or knit or crochet; puzzles were not her thing. I've tried to interest her in many things, but she just doesn't want to much of anything, except accompany me on my errands, or going in town to get her hair done. That's so frustrating, and it feels like she is just not trying to help herself at all. I really don't think it's depression, she just doesn't want to expend the energy. We go on short walks, do errands, she does the dishes and I have her help with meals. Other than that, she sits and washes t.v. and drinks wine. I just now ordered that book that was recommended above. It's hard too, because I am falling so far behind in my work. She always wants to help, but in some areas, it's so much more work than help. Like my filing-I tried to have her sort the receipts, but I ended up having to stand next to her and show her where each one went. Nix that idea :( She dusts, but I can't have her do that all the time. I really hope this book will help me. I sure need help!
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unfortunately my parents do not have a computer let alone where to start learning and with macular in my dads one eye there is another issue. I think when he started having health issues, he waited until he was really bad before going to doctor and we all know the longer you wait for anything, the longer it takes to recoop if you do. but thanks for the info
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My mom (91 years) enjoys a computer game called Peggle, and Peggle Nights. It is similar to a pinball game. It is made for children, but we all enjoy playing it. You can order it on the internet for $4.99
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