Inheritance is short $150 thousand! What can I do to find the money?

Follow
Share

My uncle was losing his site about 3 years before he died. My cousin was POA of his accounts which had about $300 thou. I asked for a breakdown of the accounts because I just felt that I couldn't trust my cousin. To my amazement...there is $150 not accounted for!! I'm furious and told the attorney...this is not right. I asked for all statements so that I could review the activity 3 months before and until his death. Two months before he died, he updated his will for the last time and said that my cousin and I would split the money in the cd's, savings, and checking account. Now I'm being told that there is no cd's or savings information that was given to him? This is crazy....what can I DO to find out where that money is??? I'm sick not knowing what I could and should do. I'm waiting for the paperwork to be sent in...and have been waiting for that for a month and a half. My uncle was of VERY sound mind...but could not read his letters from whatever institutions he had his money in. HELP!

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
20

Answers

Show:
Greg, why do you keep trying to use this forum to hawk the services of inheritance advance companies? Why don't you do some legitimate marketing?

Your post has been reported for review by the Admins, even though you no longer reference or provide specific links to inheritance advances companies.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

hi greg2015...i told the attorney that handles the trust that i knew what had been reported soooo far was short!! im sure my cousin stole thousands...but becuase i even brought it up...the trust attorney took note...and looked for more money that was not reported by my cousin. i actually was notified by a company that my father was next of kin...and recovered another $15 thou that my cousin thought she could keep. I actually got lucky and recovered quite a bit...cause my cousin was afraid to be discovered as a thief! whatever she got...good for her! karma....it will come back to bite her in the ass ... that she is!! thanks
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

By the way, 'lifeexperiences' - I had previously recommended an attorney, and/or possibly an advance on your expected inheritance... however I may have left out another helpful option -- if this situation is still dragging on mercilessly, driving you crazy, you might consider looking into heir location services... locating missing inheritances, or unclaimed inheritances... often called heir finders or missing heir finders, as well as heir location services.

At least it won't cost you anything personally as fees are paid from the estate, if you get the right heir location service, that is recommended by many of the top probate and estate attorneys in your area... and who has a ton of unclaimed estate & heir location experience, and knows how to recover unclaimed assets, missing inheritances, or unclaimed inheritances quickly and seamlessly. Unclaimed assets that belong to you apparently, in this specific case.

This type of help, a firm that knows how to recover inheritance assets that rightfully belong to you... (we'll call it unclaimed assets, or missing inheritance assets), may be a good option for you.. as well as for other readers of this forum who are in a similar situation and need to recover their unclaimed assets, or who need to establish heirship... if that's in question for some reason. Some people have significant unclaimed inheritance assets. A lot of people use a firm like American Research Bureau, or ARB, arb. or they might go to heirfinder when they need fast heir location services to recover assets, to recover missing inheritance assets, or an unclaimed inheritance... because their fees are paid from the estate, and they are fast and good. This type of arrangement gets you top level probate & estate research. If you're genuinely entitled to an inheritance you deserve the best help to establish heirship or just to recover a missing inheritance, some people are actually missing heirs, but in your case, you don't need help with identifying and locating potential heirs and beneficiaries -- you need to establish that you're entitled to a share of an unclaimed estate -- and 100% of that share should be coming to you, not just some of it! That's my two cents.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

Good work, peahead!! You remind me of my daughter, who is trained as a paralegal. She is very tenacious and not afraid to take matters into her own hands and dig in to resolve situations much like you have done. This type of scenario with inheritance hijacking is SO common nowadays it seems. I am always amazed (although I shouldn't be) at some peoples' greed when it comes to money and inheritance. In both mine and my husband's families there is that ONE sibling that wants it all for themselves. Why is that? What makes them so freakin' greedy? They are willing to give up the relationships with all their family members just to get their hands on the most cash they can grab. I just don't get it. I know it's very real and very common, but I just don't understand WHY some people are like that. Money, particularly unearned money, really brings out the truly ugly and evil side of humanity. I guess because my husband and I have plenty of money we are not going on a feeding frenzy with our parents' assets, but one sibling in each of our families is on a mission to take it all. My husband's brother has succeeded - their mother left his 4 siblings completely out of her will. Didn't even mention them. These were her kids that did a lot for her over the years. But she only chose one to inherit it all. He has gained all the cash but lost his family forever. He made sure it couldn't be contested by wrapping her main asset - her house - in a trust with himself as the successor trustee. So even though the will is quite contestable, since she had 5 children and only mentioned one, there is nothing of value that is not contained in the trust, so my husband and his other 3 sibs would each win a 1/5 share of virtually nothing. My sister has been working the same agenda with my parents. It remains to be seen how it will end, since our mother is still alive. But 3 of us siblings are kept in the dark while our mom has made our sister the only one that has access to any information about her financial matters. No transparency, no checks and balances. We'll see how it all ends. I won't be surprised if she gets it all. But before my mom goes I want to get it out of her mouth whether (or not) she wants me to have anything. I don't want my sister to be able to say "Mom didn't want you to have anything" and not know if that was truly my mom's intention. Once she's gone I will never know. That would be emotionally very painful for me to live with. It's not the money it's the parental rejection that would hurt the worst - for me, anyway.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

1PEAHEAD424335 WOW, what a story! this is a great post for people who think they can do nothing! so glad you were able to get at some of your money!!!! good for you!
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

You have mentioned a will and a trust. A will has an executor/administrator whereas a trust has a trustee. A will goes through probate, a trust does not. Without you actually seeing a copy of the will,what your uncle told you is all hearsay. Part of the probate process is sending letters to all heirs indicated in the will. If none are named, the estate would be divided according to the laws of descendancy in that state. If your cousin is his child, she then, would receive the proceeds from the estate. Unless you are named in the will or the trust, your uncle's statement to you is mute. How do you know there was $300,000 dollars in your uncle's assets prior to his death? Did you see documented proof? A POA is not required to show you proof of your uncle's financials. An executor does not have to show you proof of estate documents if you are not named in the will. If you are not named in a trust, the trustee does not have to provide you with documentation. If you are relying solely on the word of your uncle, your rights are very limited as a nephew/niece.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Do not trust what you are told. Get everything in writing. Do not do this on your own, get an attorney. Sometimes people think they have more money than they do cause they forget they took money out of accounts. Call all the local banks to see if they person had an account. You will need their SS number. Also contact the state, often funds that go dorment for over a year go to the state, and u can recover those funds. Get an legal help from people who do this all the time.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Sorry for any typos, grammar issues - it's late here (Redondo Beach, CA) couldn't sleep - husb is really snoring tonight - bless his heart. I was faced with much the same problem about 8-9 yrs. ago and my fight with my half-sister lasted nearly 5 yrs. She was Agent under POA (medical & financial) and Pers. Rep. under my father's will. Problem #1 - Dad died in CO where 1/2 sis & husb. after just buying 3+ acres horse prop. for $275,000 CASH!!!! and after being renters for the last 2 decades and only income source from husb working pt as long-haul truck driver. To make things more difficult for me, dad owned real property in WA & AZ - (WA add. his primary res.) and I live in CA. When my dad realized mental capabilities were declining and had always regarded me as a common sense organizer of just about everything. So he asked me to spend about a week in WA setting up a 'reminder' system that he could make sense of (bills, statements, quarterly taxes due, when to take pills, etc.) It was while I was sorting through, filing or processing the mountains of paperwork, mail, statements, etc. that I realized my father had WELL over 1.3 mil. in assets. He then asked me to come to his "snow-bird" home in AZ and organize things the same way I did in WA. I discovered and add'l $200,000 in stocks that he owned. I never even considered writing down what & where his assets were - not my business... until my father passed a couple of years later & my sister moved dad to CO near her & against my strong protests. I wished that I had taken copies of everything. She got 2 doctors to declare dad incompetent about 1 yr. before his death and made it virtually impossible for me to visit him. Shortly after his death, I requested a copy of the stmt of estate assets sis was required to file with the probate court. Imagine my shock when assets totaled less than $33,000 uhmm wonder where the $275,000 came from she used to pay for her newly acquired horse prop. - complete with horses & new barn. Every attempt I made to obtain any info. re: my dad (medical & financial) I was stopped dead in my tracks due to PRIVACY LAWS, My CA atty who referred me to an idiot atty in CO said "how are you going to prove; #1 that my dad actually did have this alleged substantial amt. in assets; and #2 show that dad did not willingly give sis this money because he wanted her to have it? Both of these attorneys, specializing in probate matters remember, were clueless regarding side-stepping privacy laws, obtaining financial records, bank acct records, etc. I couldn't believe it - two probate attys in 2 states telling me, in short, proving elderly financial abuse will be extremely difficult if not impossible and wind up costing far more than my share of the $33,000 plus half of the proceeds from the sale of my dad's AZ property which SHE valued at $40,000 because her son was going to purchase (fair mkt value was $180,000 - but no one, including my stupid atty, made her obtain a professional appraisal). No way was I going to stand for or accept this. So, armed with only a B.S. degree and an employment background as a senior paralegal in CA for 7 yrs., I charged in head first. Instead of only receiving appx. $35,000 I managed to get close to $262,000 (still far short of the $650,000 - $750,000 my dad had intended me to receive). I used certified copies of my dad's will, the Freedom of Information Act., copies of my dads FEDERAL TAX TRANSCRIPTS, notarized copies of letters to investment co's, banks, stock companies, etc. and an eye for handwriting analysis which the judge holding the mediation hearing had confirmed fraudulent through the Sherriff's Forensics Handwriting Dept. prior to the hearing (and which sis had submitted as truthful & original evidence to support her defense that just a few months before his death, dad decided he hated me, wanted to take me out of his will & give her everything. Sis lost any credibility that she may have had, my atty. was sanctioned for not proceeding with my case in a timely manner thereby giving sis more time to spend money from my share - It was strongly suggested by the judge that my atty waive any money I owed him (just over $10,000 - already paid $32,000), or he would find a way to tell me my atty is guilty of malpractice (which I already knew.) Anyway, the details of my triumph over privacy laws, convincing the company that my dad had selected to administer my share of his estate through a testamentary trust to decline this position; and so much more will take a lot more time to explain. If you can provide me with a way to contact you (maybe set up a free temporary email acct. I will respond. Anyway, don't believe anyone that says it can't be done, or it will cost you a lot of money and you will be worse off fighting it. I know, for a fact, by first hand experience because I thought things through and gave it a shot - Fight It with everything you have!!!!!!
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

I am DPOA and executor of my moms will. I have had complete control and oversite for over three years. My mom never wants to know anything - beyond knowing she is being taken care of. My mom has a chunk of change which I look after. I have no intention of defrauding my two brothers - if there is anything left by the time mom passes on. That's said - if I were dishonest - the evil, manipulating sort - it would be very easy to do. Very easy. I'm afraid you may find yourself SOL. Hire a forensic accountant if and when you finally get the account information and things don't add up. In the meantime I remain as transparent as possible and provide my brothers with whatever info they ask for - short of actual account numbers and passwords. There was a reason my parents chose me for this job instead of either one of my brothers.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

hey...thanks for your answer....and since I've brought these concerns to light as soon as I found out that all the money wasn't there...she did furnish the paperwork for the stocks! We did get that $150 thou from her...and lucky for that! I have since been contacted about a stock that she did not declare and I know she knew about that...and am working on getting that money too...it's about $10 thou. and yes, $150 thou is a lot of money...unlike some of the answers that I got previously!!! lol thanks again!
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Related
Questions