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What info is there for an elderly person who is having a leg removed and will be in a wheelchair and disabled for the first time? She does not have the money/resources to adapt her home to ada standards and is there help to prepare her for the mental dissadvantage that she will be facing



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In Michigan there's a Rehab Institute which provides therapy for people undergoing changes with mobility. You might google your area to see if there's a similar institute that could help with PT and OT.

I think your mother's doctor could prescribe home care, which really should be in place for a change of this nature, unless your mom is going to a rehab facility first for acclimation to her new situation.

Ask the hospital's social worker and discharge planner if they know of any assistance, as well as any support groups.

Are you home all day with your mother to help her adapt? Even so, medical and therapeutic adaptation prescribed by her physician would be tremendously helpful.

For adaptations to the home, check with your local community senior center or municipal building department (or possibly other department) to see if they get any HUD funds to retrofit homes for people in need. My community used to get them, sometime after the beginning of the fiscal year, but I haven't checked lately.

In Michigan there's also an inter-county agency that assists with modest retrofits, such as grab bar installation. Contact your local Area Agency on Aging to learn if there's a similar service in your area.

Habitat for Humanity and Christmas in Action are 2 organizations that also provide (free, I believe), services to people in need. HfH does home repairs, some remodeling & renovation (post disaster I believe), but the scope may also differ from area to area.

Some local churches also provide this assistance. I've read that some United Methodist churches offer this in some states, but you'll have to do some searching to find out if they're active in your area.

Also call United Way's hotline, 211, to ask about organizations that can help.

I'm sorry to learn that this surgery will be affecting you and your mother's lives, but hope that you do find some assistance to help guide you through the trauma.
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