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We moved my inlaws to a retirement community a year ago and they have their own garden home that they bought. Unfortunately they are both now having issues with daily chores, walking, sleeping , daily hygiene etc. and my MIL is a hoarder. Our family has been torn apart due to my inlaws choices of taking care of themselves and they way they live. When we moved them from their previous home (due to health issues) there was/is so much "junk" that my husband and one of his other brothers got into an all out fight over what to donate, throw away etc. and have not spoken in over a year now.
Basically all of the junk that was in the house got moved to the new smaller home and never unpacked or put into its proper place and boxes and junk still sit where they landed on moving day. All that stuff with the added "new " stuff has taken over the house to where my inlaws are now living out of one room. You cannot go into the kitchen, so fast food is what is eaten, baths are not being taken and the house is nasty.
I am at the point of calling Adult Services to get involved but just found out that unless they are abused or neglected no action can be taken.
Is there anyone else or department I can call for help with them?

Thank you,

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If they live in a retirement community.. can you call anyone on the board for advice or help?
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From your description, it seems that they have more problems than hoarding. If they are not able to care for themselves by providing their own meals, bathing laundry, medication, paying bills, etc., then perhaps a plan can be put into place. Is your husband interested in obtaining guardianship over them? If so, then I would see an attorney about that process to see how it works and if you have enough evidence to proceed.

Do any family members have contact with their doctors?
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Call the Office of the Aging in your county. It won't hurt to have someone go check on them. Seek Guardianship, it is time. A court evaluator will interview them and may recommend a higher level of care.
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