Follow
Share

I live in Texas. I looked through Department of Aging and Disability website. I think they also call it a service plan. Some AL even do it every 6 months.

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
I understand it has to be annual. They never gave him one after he moved in...we requested one. He's not there anymore...we moved him.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I am in Texas as well and advocate for an old friend who lives nearby. They represented to us that ALFs in Texas are required by the State to have a current assessment on file executed by them and whoever is responsible for healthcare decisions and payment. The way I understood it, assessment of resident needs are required to be done annually and may be done as needed or requested. The Service Plan is the facilities program for addressing needs or conditions covered in the assessment and is also the vehicle for billing for added/deleted services.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

In my opinion, these meetings can be very helpful for your loved one. I always attended these and often took my contact information and my dad's hospice nurse to these meetings. There were a few times when I requested the meeting, since my understanding was that every 3 months they were required. Often there is much transition in nursing homes, so you may need to stay in touch and ask for the meeting. For my dad, these were called "Care Plan Meeting" and that's what we discussed. We talked about his diet, his medications, his mental and physical needs, and even if the care staff saw needs such as clothing or bedding that might make him more comfortable or easier for them to help him get dressed, etc. Some of the meetings were more helpful than others, but it certainly allowed those caring for my dad to know how much I genuinely appreciated their help. It also helped for me to be a voice for my dad when I knew something in his care or in the facility was frustrating him, but he didn't know how to ask for help or to correct something he didn't like (for example waking him at certain time of night to change him). When we worked as a team to make his needs the priority, everyone seemed happier. Good nursing facilities will listen and will work with family. I was very much blessed to have this kind of care for my dad.
Helpful Answer (4)
Report

TX has 2 types of AL ..... CCF and CBA. Which 1 makes a difference on requirements.
CCF custodial continuing care facility asst living. Not ever paid by Medicaid waiver.
CBA community based alternative assisted living. CBA AL can be paid by Medicaid waiver. Has very limited enrollment & # of vendors. Higher level care than CCF. 

Which type is your mom’s? Most AL in TX is private pay CCF AL.

For my mom in TX in skilled nursing care aka a NH, the care plan meeting was every 90 days & I got a letter abt mo in advance with 30 minute meeting slots to choose from. They could be done via conference call if need be. For skilled nursing a required 90 day meeting I think is federally mandated by Medicare.

But when she was in IL, the residency contract used was for both IL & AL-CCF & within document stated a required bi-annual review. (Mom’s IL was within a tiered community that ran from Il to AL (both types), NH & Hospice). The notification of time & date was in mom’s bill the months of the twice a yr review. I was not contacted as to it happening. I went to one & it was more abt how costs were to increase & the rules on scheduling transportation.  In moms contract there was a line that facility could at their discretion have an incident based residency review. Mom had an incident based review due to issues with her wandering at night in the IL hallways while doing laundry. I was contacted regarding this meeting & it was in retrospect good as it basically let me know that mom wasn’t likely long to stay in IL, I got her eligible for skilled nursing needed and moved her into NH within around 6 - 7 mos after incident meeting. Mom did the jump to hyperspace from IL to NH onto Medicaid without the AL phase too. 
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

At the NH where my wife is recovering from a stroke they have a Care Plan meeting every 3 months. (Florida). However you have to fight for the services your loved one needs. They expect you to just sit and agree with everything they say. Watch the surprises look on their faces when you speak up or complain.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

My father's nursing home did a Care Plan meeting every three months with all the heads of departments attending.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Look at your contract. If it's not in the contract, ask the director what is the policy.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Are u talking about the yearly increase or re-evaluation? If talking about his care plan you should have a regular meeting. You can request one.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.