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I can deal with so many disgusting things, insects, body fluids, rotting garbage, road kill. But for some reason my father's feet freak me out. His toenails need to be dealt with. You have no idea. Or maybe you do. You could trim off yellow guitar picks. Who can I hire to deal with cutting his toenails? He's not able to walk and I think that he'd find a pedicure in a salon humiliating. Is a podiatrist overkill? I just can't bring myself to trim them. My mother's hands are too shaky for me to suggest that she do it. My understanding is that it is forbidden for CNAs or nurses though he's not diabetic.

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Just get your elder to a podiatrist, medicare pays. Safest way to go, and often, podiatrists make home visits.

Leave it to the professionals and keep regular appointments. Soak feet in Epsom salts or apple cider vinegar between visits, keep them clean and then keep them dry and in the open air as much as possible. Topical fungal creams really do not work, but it can't hurt to use one to keep some moisture on dry toe nails a few times a week.

Keep tub and shower floors super clean. You are not alone and it is weird and gross if the nails are out of control!
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Reply to UptoHere
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Hell no a podiatrist isn't overkill, it's their job! I don't know about CNA's or nurses doing it, but it sounds like you are dealing with a common fungal type situation. As I understand it, in a worse case scenario (VERY extreme) it could result in the loss of the nail/toe in a diabetic...yet medicare won't cover for the fungal treatment if I am remembering it right. Around here we have a podiatrist or two who make home visits, bless them. Call your local office on aging or a home care agency to ask if they know of anyone. FYI, Medicare only covers it once every 9 weeks which is also insane. We have a local podiatrist who actually has "walk in" hours two days a week...where you just show up and wait your turn. It is an issue so many are dealing with...I mean we ALL have toe nails and they ALL grow. My mom's fingernails are an issue as well, but we are very fortunate that one of the nail people in a Salon Lofts setting is willing to categorize trimming and filing her fingernails as an "express manicure" or similar and it runs about $15-20 with tip, but I am SO grateful, as well as for the convenience that she is right next door to mom's hair wash/blow dry guy. IF all else fails, call your local hospice agency...even if Dad is not a candidate, they may know a resource.
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Reply to gdaughter
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We have an agency in our area called FootCare by Nurses.  They are trained in foot care and usually go in every other month.  They do a whole foot assessment on the 1st visit.  Check with your local ASAP (Aging Service Access Point), AAA (Area Agency on Aging) or your Council on Aging and see if they have someone to recommend.
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Reply to EllensOnly
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No podiatrist not an overkill, cost about 50.00 to 100.00 for the office with but with insurance it maybe zero, its quick and easy.
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Reply to hangon
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By all means find a podiatrist to do them. Medicare will cover the cost every 6 weeks if he has seen a primary care Dr. They will cover the cost every 4 weeks if he is diabetic. I don't have the strength to cut my mom's. We had been going to a nail tech, but she always cut long and because my mom had ingrown toe nails she never really got to the corners. Her moving was the best thing. Now I have mom on a regular basis with a podiatrist. Best her toe nails have looked in a long time. So NO, it is not an over kill.
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Reply to motherofdreams
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It is true that the CNA‘s and nurses are not able to cut nails. In a recent visit to my mom she took off her shoes and socks and I realized her nails are growing upward and were about a quarter of an inch long. It freaked me out too. So I made an appointment for her to see a podiatrist that comes into the assisted living facility where she resides. I tried to cut them with a nail clipper but they were so tough I could barely trim them and I have a strong grip. Definitely use a professional podiatrist for cutting fingernails and toenails. Also, check the condition of the actual nails in case there is a fungus as well.
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Reply to ELKB227
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I have the problem on mine!
 After using an over/counter product "heals in one week"
 About $18 at W/M, sometimes cheaper online...
 it did. I still have the problem, but now the nails
are flat and manageable.

I have been using this product for about 9 mo.
 Softens the nail and skin. Allows me to file without drawing blood.

The toenails have flattened.

The package distinctly says that you can not heal this without
 a prescription.

However, maintenance is a good thing.

 Before, I would try to flatten the nails with filing, and would draw blood.

The quick grows up into the arch of the affected nail .


 Now, my nails look "normal". Flat, no blood.
The medication apparently keeps the quick from over growing.
 

This also helped with arching/ingrown toenails.
Easy fix: stuff cotton under the nail so that the nail won't drive like a spear into the skin.
That is not a cutting. It is lifting the nail to train its growth.

The medication softens the nail,too. If applied too often.

The nail bed tends to dissolve. (good up to a certain point).
Then you cut back.
 I can wear regular shoes now without my big toe jabbing into the upper last.

 Yes, and to gross you out, I do have to dig in under the nail, but it's my nail.
I follow up later with itty bitty scissors.

And well worth the trouble.

 Another skin softener is hydrogen peroxide.
When the nail loosens, using the above-mentioned product", cut back;
you have gone far enough.
 I did work in a nursing home
 and saw a pnt admitted with 8" curved toenails.

 Somebody, somewhere, held on as long as they could.

You are not alone.
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Reply to anonymous811405
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hangon Sep 30, 2018
can you provide the name of the product you used, thanks.
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Just a suggestion from my nail salon gal, coconut oil is much better to moisturize feet & skin.
Mom (84) and I both have ingrown toenails, so we get pedicures every month. Mom's is so bad from years of work shoes, but They do great work and it really looks so much better. Find someone who can come to your home & pamper his feet & after a while he may come to enjoy it!
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Reply to naia2077
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My dad is 89 and had the worse nails ever 4 years ago, thick, way too long (some 4 inches) some had several nails growing on top of each other, all yellow and peeling. Took him to a podiatrist no fungus, just not cut in forever. They could cut every 3 months and Medicare would pay. Took dad to my pedicure salon. He was hesitant, but we did manny/pedis together. The owners treat dad like a king and got his nails right. It’s been over 4 years now and his nails still turn yellow but they suggested Vick’s vapor rub on the nails each night, as that happens to a lot of elderly who have to take some drugs and don’t bath or move like they use to. It works. Thicker nails just happens as we get older.
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Reply to an7gels
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Part of the diabetic foot care is to NOT soak them; I think it makes the skin too soft and it's easy to get too hot, which someone with nerve damage won't be aware of. Probably good to be careful of vinegar, etc. I've gotten in the habit of creaming my feet before I put my socks on--you can get foot cream but leftover hand or face cream works. Helps keep the skin from cracking.
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Reply to partsmom
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Llamalover47 Sep 19, 2018
partsmom: He is not diabetic.☺
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That is too funny that you can deal with all of the other disgusting things. I cannot handle the phleghm and body fluids etc. I can handle the toenails!
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gdaughter Oct 7, 2018
Can we hire you??? :-)
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Our local ASAP had a contract with a nursing group that goes to consumers homes and does foot care every 8 weeks.
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Reply to EllensOnly
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We have a foot care specialist that comes to the house and is paid for by Medicare. My dad is diabetic so that might be why we get the service but it is worth checking into.
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Reply to Babs75
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Once has a person has developed toenail fungus as well as thick toenails, they are extremely hard to manage. The podiatrist may give you an ointment to apply, which usually does not work. There are oral meds one can take. They say if soaked in Listerine that it MAY work.
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Reply to Llamalover47
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Medicare pays for home visits by podiatrist
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rocketjcat Sep 18, 2018
My experience was the podiatrist first visit was paid by Medicare. He told me only if she had diabetes (she doesn’t) would more visits be covered so I paid $50 out of pocket for subsequent visits.
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Podiatrist
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Reply to Llamalover47
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My dad has disgusting yellow toenails too. He now goes to a podiatrist to have them trimmed. Well not really trimmed; more like saws and chisels! Seriously a regular toe nail clipper isnt enough because they are so thick.
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Reply to mlcjohnson
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The podiatrist is the best place to call, because they are foot specialist. To my way of thinking one should never ever go to a nail salon for feet pedicure,why? They are not doctors, not clean, can be very nasty and pass germs to everyone.


Also, if he has long thick toenails (fungus) ask the podiatrist Dr for a prescription Ciclopirox CREAM 0.77%. Apply on toenails around and under the nails in the morning and at bed time.

After using the Ciclopirox Cream, in 2-3 weeks the skin pulls away from the toenails, making it easier to clip without any pain; do this in the morning and at night. I did this for my Dad, and I also, use the cream morning and bedtime.
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Reply to Flaca2018
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Bok,
Don't feel bad, everybody has their "gross out".

A podiatrist would be the one to choose. Especially if he has nail fungus that turns the nails thick and yellow. These are very hard to cut.

You are right, a CNA is not allowed to cut hair or nails in all the companies I know of.
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Reply to SueC1957
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Podiatrist is not overkill.
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Reply to XenaJada
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I operate a Mobile business where I provide in-home toenail trimming, Pedicure and Manicure services to Local North Carolina resident's.

You are right, CNA's are not legally able to clip the toenails of their client. This has to be done by a Licensed Pedicurist or Podiatrist.

You can google "Mobile Foot care" Or "Mobile Pedicurist/Podiatrist" for your area and see what comes up.

Hope this helped you out.
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Reply to NCPedicurist
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dkentz72 Sep 13, 2018
You business for what you do and see, deserve a medal and/or a National Day.

I've seen what ya'll deal with when you're going thru Cosmetology school! People should spend a day or two when the nursing homes bring their residents to you for practice. I've seen some extremely disgusting feet.

Howard Hughes hands/feet looked manicured compared to what these students have to put up with.
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Yes, podiatrist is the best Professional to do it! I have my dad’s cut every 3 mos. You didn’t say where he lives but my dad’s independent living facility had someone come in every few mos to do that even though there was a salon on site. My mom’s memory care facility had the same thing. Just better for a professional. That way they can keep an eye on any infections or issues that are going on. If he still lives at home you might have to hire a handicapped van to take him if you can’t.
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Reply to pargirl
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Medicare/Insurance does cover podiatrist’s. Nail salons should be avoided at all costs, especially if your father has diabetes like mine. One wrong clip could lead to all sorts of issues and the possibility of him getting a fungus far outweighs taking that risk. I actually had no idea that podiatrists were covered until I mentioned taking my dad to a nail salon and my aunt had a fit!!!! She told me about the podiatrist visits being covered. I had to go through his PCP but it was as worth it. Not only does the podiatrist clip his toenails every two-three months, but he can tell a lot about his overall health by looking at the feet. He also referred my dad to an orthopedic for special diabetic shoes which are also covered. One new pair each year. Hope this helps!
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Reply to Virgie32818
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I hated to trim my Mom's fingernails and toenails. For any personal jobs that disgusted me, I learned to not think, just do.

Beforehand I didn't think or imagine doing them. I blanked my mind, gathered the tools, and just did it...without looking too close. Then I learned to do them more often so they weren't so awful. Then I got used to it. Then I noticed that Mom had really beautiful, young-looking hands and her feet weren't that bad either. Then I took pride in knowing she couldn't horribly scratch herself in her sleep with her shorter fingernails and her toes lay where they should and Mom was more comfortable.
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Reply to MountainMoose
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I can't do nails either.  Cut one of my own toes.  My aunt went podiatry first, but now I take her in wheelchair to where she gets her hair cut.  Same lady does the pedicure.  Soaking feet first helps immensely with cutting the nails, and she loves the foot massage.  Besides, it helps with circulation.
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Reply to GrannieAnnie
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Podiatrist fees are covered by Medicare. Make an appointment, or if in the hospital ask the doctor to call a Podiatrist in for treatment.
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Reply to Ricky6
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Phone call to a podiatrist. Easy peasy. They can check for any problems and help clear them up. The aged foot might be more than a manacurist can handle. Very thick nails, and very frail thin skin. They can also - (as they should) refuse to work on toes that have a fungus. It is quite common. It can get passed to the person's other healthy toenails, and be spread to other people. Manicurists are taught to recognize nail issues, but not trained to diagnose and treat them. Good luck.
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Reply to Jasmina
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Check with your local seniors centre - our has once a month specialists come in - they probably will advice you

If your dad's toes are really bad try finding a chiropodist [sp?] - mine also does orthotics, removes corns etc too
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Reply to moecam
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Mom didn't have any health issues that would prevent her from going to a salon, so once she was unable to take care of her own feet, she and my daughter had a standing date at the salon for a pedicure. I made sure that the technician was conservative in her approach and that the chair sink set-up was accessible for her. Some salons require you to be a bit of a mountain goat to climb up and into the chair others are more friendly to the disabled. I also made sure that the salon used sterile technique such as lined sinks and sterilized equipment and mom bypassed the nail polish part. Mom enjoyed some of the extras too like a paraffin treatment or warm oil treatment. For Christmas, Santa brought her a cute pair of wool fleece boots that she would slip on after the salon treat. Mom looked forward to a pedicure and lunch with her granddaughter; we only wished we had started this lovely tradition sooner! I guess your dad might not feel humiliated or mind, if the pampering feels good. Paraffin treatments are fabulous for those who suffer arthritis. The salon technicians who mom and daughter went to were very sweet and respectful to my mother who was in her late 80s. Whether you choose the salon route or a podiatrist, you or his CNA or nurse can help him "maintain" with a little emory board filing and foot washes in a basin in between appointments.
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moecam Sep 12, 2018
Last pedicure I had the lady beside me brought in her own tools - so I might try it from now on - something to think about
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Foot care is important and a podiatrist is the place you need to take him. It's what they do and they can catch any problems early to prevent amputations and infections. If you were here in Salt Lake City I'd recommend our favorite Dr Scott Clarke at the Advanced Foot and Ankle clinic. He was a miracle worker for my husband with a stubbed toe that became life threatening. Lost all of his toes, but saved his foot when other doctors were saying they would amputate below the knee.
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